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What are Django Fontina Postcards

Django Fontina Postcard Wordpress.com

In contrary to what you may think, postcards are not just about greetings, invitations and all. In fact, while it seems like postcards were just the real deal in the past, especially when used as a means of communication, most tourist actually used their postcards to spread poetry to others. And those type of postcards is what came to be known as the Django Fontina Postcard. So today, we are going to look at what this type of postcard is, how it originated, and what it was later used for.

WHAT IS DJANGO FONTINA POSTCARD?

Simply stated, Django Fontina postcard is one that is written to a random stranger, containing poems in it. Depending on the size of the postcard, the sender can decide to write more than one poetry in the postcard.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF DJANGO FONTINA

The inked(typed) poems on most of the Django Fontina postcards were taken and reconstructed into text form, from old postcards. The sending of Django postcard was really in vogue during the 1970s, and were often sent from popular tourist destinations around Britain.  That’s why in the series “Wish you were here” each poem are paired by a continuous-line drawing of a map identifying the location described. In other words, the sender of these postcards where not necessarily poets, but were just creative enough to translate pictures on old postcards into something poetic.

PEOPLE WHO TOOK PART IN SENDING DJANGO FONTINA POSTCARDS

Most of the times, the participants were always invited to make a poetic contribution into published books or poetry collections. And when they were done, since they won’t be credited for the work on the published book, they would then write the same poems in a postcard and send them to random strangers, so that they would recognize that was their poem in which the editors used in the published books, or poetry collections. So, while some sent Django Fontina for just the fun it, others did it to gain popularity or acknowledgement for their poems.

EXAMPLES OF DJANGO FONTINA

Here are some examples of how the poems in Django Fontina Postcards often appeared.

  1. Dear You, or Belulino,

She, there, dangling mobile, is missing her better half.  And what is that thing eating the snowman’s nose? And why is his nose so low like it’s his…sick, he must be running a cold from all the heat heat hot. HO ho hmmm, he sure looks like he’s melting. By jingo! A dollop, a dollop, and bloody coo! A cudgel, to bludgeon. But walloping whom? The wolf, the wolf, took a bite of the moon. Look! His marmalade maw, his guilty, red paw. The rabbit, the rabbit, is hungry for carrots. The sun, the sky, they like a good drink. So they toast and they chug, until little is left but a top hat, some buttons, a crimson foulard. Then the homeless, they lute, for winter is hard. And what’s to be said of the weapon, but that the snowman needed protection? Still, he was eaten, he was drunk––he was all out of luck. The morn was here and the moon was there. Everything passes in this “living” affair.

Except when you buy electric snowmen from me, Django Fontina, the premier plug-in snowman dealer in all the land. So help stop the violence and shop here, where we keep the moon full all winter long.

Yours,

Django Fontina

  1. Dear you, or Belulino,

Momma said never to ask him all those questions about what who why ever.

Said shut your mouth, he don’t need yo lip.

But sometimes in hush hush, he put a blanket over heads,

And sneak me some true Poppa wisp hers,

Like jumps through double Dutch.

About how torture was when they plug up the fire hydrants and erase the hopscotch chalk Up from your pavement,

All that happening inside you,

And that’s where scar tissue on broken backs web from.

Teacher said we like this for the storm keep rattling at us,

Blows seeds to where they don’t belong,

Which means diversity,

Like how when Momma fight Poppa I catch words I never heard.

Adultery = grown speak.

But the storm is less than half the deck, Poppa wisp her’d.

The kings and queens ride the mess.

And all the fuss and holler just dust below the light.

That’s why I’ve gotta learn and write, to make for better seeing,

Like Byrds of Jazz fly on high.

Momma said raps are the poems of nightness,

So I should black up my verses to rhyming bars for stardom.

She said Poppa yells at her cause he wanted to be famous and but became just an old broke soldier,

That war made his blood boil always too hot in his neck veins,

But I think she just don’t know how to please a man.

His words always just nice warm to me.

I like to wisp her down my words for true secrets float above the dust,

Like ice cream over root beer.

And little girls need more than school to not become like Mommas,

Which is why I still ask Poppa questions in hush hush with the blanket over heads.

Yours,

Django Fontina

  1. Dear you,

The quiet and leisure I was now enjoying, I made use of further in arranging and working out many things which I had commenced in days of the wildest confusion.  I read over and revised my chromatic papers: drew various diagrams for my colour-tables, which I altered repeatedly, in order to make clearer what I wished to represent and maintain.

Yours,

Mendo Allen

THE FAMOUS SERIES OF DJANGO FONTINA POSTCARDS

There is a compilation, or what you could call a series of Django Fontina postcards known as “Wish you were here”. This is a series of Django Fontina postcards which as I stated earlier, are a form of postcard written and posted to strangers as a means of distributing poetry.

THE STRUCTURES AND FORM OF DJANGO FONTINA POSTCARD

The poems in each Django Fontina postcard was often inked in black, while maintaining a very tiny but witty font to fit in, most of the poetry. As noted by most historians, Django Fontina Postcards were devoid of actual pictures, rather, the poems were accompanied by things like symbols or what we could call today clip-arts.

So, what do you think? Were those tourists who practised the art of sending Django Fontina postcards adventurous? Or where they just ignorant?

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards
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What are Artist Signed Postcards

Artists-signed postcards have been around for so long, especially when technology was never an idea. So today, we are going to be looking at what this form of the postcard is, how it started, and some of its prominent designers. And without any further ado, let’s get started!

WHAT ARE ARTIST SIGNED POSTCARDS AND HOW ARE THEY MADE?

Basically, Artist-signed postcards are simply reproductions of original works of art. To date, it is the most collectible (sort after) type of postcards in the world of art. However, just because they are called artist signed postcards does not mean that all of them were autographed by the artists themselves, no. Now, this is what used to happen. Back then, oftentimes, the original drawing or painting were signed with the real artist ‘s full name, monogram or initials, and when the artwork is being reproduced, they will just replicate the signature. Something like a photocopy of the original signature.

THE ARTIST SIGNED POSTCARD ERA

The artist signed the postcard’s dominant era was specifically between 1898 to 1918 when the world was not yet introduced to the wonders of technology where they could have had cell phones, radios, computers or TV. Thus, these postcards were an economical and easy means to keep in touch with one another. And that’s why most of the artist signed postcards were made to be pictured, printed, and mailed to acquaintances. Other sources of artist-signed postcards were newspapers and magazines, comic strips, illustrations, posters, kid’s books, and so on.

THE SIGNATURES

In regards to the signatures on these artworks, the artist was often left with two choices. Either to keep the signature after reproducing the work into postcards for commercial purposes, or blur/crop out the signature if the artist was a passionate type who wasn’t after commercializing the reproduced postcards. Interestingly, the unsigned postcards where the artists often decided to blur or crop out the original signature, if attractive, where often priced at a higher value than the just duplicated ones.

THE ROLE AND GROWTH OF WOMEN

During this era when artist signed postcards were trending, surprisingly, women were of high value in the art industry, which made most of them seriously consider the postcard reproduction professional as a career path. An example of such a women who stood up to the task was Rose O’Neill, maker of the Kewpie, who had the foresight of copyrighting her pictures. Turns out, she succeeded and was able to accumulate a great deal of fortune in her lifetime. Other than her, famous and highly talented artists like Ellen Clapsaddle, Grace Gebbie Drayton, and Frances Brundage took up the job of always drawing cute full(chubby-cheeked) kids for postcards, newspapers, magazines, kid’s books, advertisements agencies, and paper dolls.

INSTANCES OF ARTIST SIGNED POSTCARDS

Below are some of the instances were artists reproduced artworks into signed postcards.

  1. In 1910, Frances Brundage stopped working for Tuck, and as a result, took her illustrations to the Samuel Gabriel Company of New York. When she got to the company, Brundage altered Tuck’s original style, leaving her fellow Victorian girls out of business, just to please the new publisher who needed a more naturalistic appearance of kids running, playing, and horsing around. There and then, Brundage signed the postcard, which was originally Tuck’s with her full name, and thus becoming popular for it. Today, these Gabriel postcards are quite easy to find.

  1. When Grace Gebbie Drayton-Wiederseim was a little girl, she drew big-eyed round-faced self-portraits and then based her Campbell’s Kids advertising characters on it. And in 1904, she got a contract for a well-loved soup company, where she worked for 20 years, drawing all kinds of advertisements, producing book and magazine illustrations, and Dolly Dingle holiday cards/ paper dolls, while still maintaining the exact same style of adorable children. But during her first marriage (1900-1911), she had to sign her cards with the inscription G.G. Wiederseim, because that’s what the publishers wanted. All the publishers who published her postcards between 1907-1911 included, Reinthal & Newman, Campbell Art Co., Tuck, A.M. Davis, and Alfred Schweiser. Nevertheless, Drayton quickly remarried in 1911, and her postcards were republished, this time, only by Reinthal & Newman between 1911 and 1916 under her real name, G.G. Drayton. And as I stated earlier, the card became highly prized by collectors because the postcard contained the signature of an artist who was not only great at drawing, but alive at that moment.

  1. Rose O’Neill started out her career by vending illustrations to magazines such as “Truth,” “Collier’s,” “Harper’s Monthly,” and “Bazaar.” In 1896, she got married to one Gray Latham, and as a result, had to work for “Puck,” where she had the opportunity to produce over 700-plus drawings, signed “O’Neill Latham, instead of Rose. Toward the end of their five-year marriage, she reproduced similar postcards this time, dropping the “Latham” and replacing it with the place “Rose”. Currently, these postcards are now with the signature Rose O’Neill.

Other artist signed postcard makers, well known for their ability to convert old artworks into artist signed postcards included;

Mabel Lucie

Attwell

Kathe Kruse

Jessie Willcox Smith

Bessie Pease Gutmann

Katharine Gassaway

Jason Frexias

Charles R. Twelvetrees

Bernhardt Wall, Elisabeth Bem

Magnus Greiner

Ida Waugh

Rie Cramer

H.B. Griggs.

In a nutshell, artist signed postcards where very popular and lucrative between 1898 to 1914 to be precise. After World War 1 broke out in 1914, postcards generally, not only artist-signed ones were in the fall because, they were considered expensive, plus, technology had found its way by then through the invention of telephones and so on, thus making postcards more or less redundant. However, the important point is that during this era, when the artist-signed postcards where invoke, women were more dominant than their male counterparts. From the likes of Frances Brundage, Grace Drayton, Rose O’Neill and so on, the commercialization of artist-signed postcards really favored the female artists. So, if you’d love to see how these postcards looked like, you can check them out on Darlenesoldpostcards and let us know what you think of this high sort for work of art.

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards
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What are Composite Postcards

Example of Composite Postcards

Lately, we’ve been having some heart to heart discussions on the types of postcards, and how wonderful they are. And so today, still in that same spirit of “postcarding”, if that even makes any sense, we will be looking at another popular type of postcards.; the one most people commonly refer to as composites postcards. So as usual, we’ll get to analyze what this form of postcard is, its history, and its format, who needs it, how it is being used and so on. And without any further ado, let’s get on with it.

What is Composites Postcard?

 

Composite – This is a photograph with two separate images printed on the same photo paper.

Basically, a composite postcard is a marketing tool for actors, most especially models. They serve as the latest and most efficient of a model’s portfolio, which is often being used as a business postcard. In other words, a Composite postcard is what agencies use to submit a prospective model to clients for work. Sometimes today, they do it digitally, but it is a collection of pictures that they’re going to show to clients to say, hey, we think this is the girl/guy that you should hire for the job. So generally, a composite postcard generally is an eight and a half by five and a half size card, which is half the size of a sheet of paper.  It’s a thick cardstock and it is basically a model business card. On the front, you are going to have your headshot with your name underneath. On the back, you will have four photos you want to show some range of personality. And in those four pictures, you want to have different looks, different hairstyles and so on.

Then on the bottom of the composite postcard, you’ve got your measurements, your height, your bust, waist, hips, dress size, shoe size, eye color, and hair color. Then the little extra space at the bottom is so that agencies have room to add a sticker with their contact information. However, never put your email address or your phone number on your composite card, as agencies won’t be able to use it. Below is a complete rundown of its format.

Format  

A composites postcard typically contains a minimum of two pages – a cover page with a full-size portrait and a second page with a selection of representative shots from the portfolio. It lists the model’s basic stats – typically height, weight, three sizes (bust, waist, hips) for women, suit or chest size and waist and inseam sizes for men, plus shoe size, eye, and hair color, nationality, and contact information. It is printed on both sides of an 8.5″ x 5.5″ [4] piece of postcard stock (12 pt stock) (US) or A5 on postcard weight (350/400 g/m2 stock in metric countries) which is between 300 and 450 μm thick depending on the postcard stock or quality chosen (Europe, Asia).

History

Peter Marlowe in London invented models composites in 1965, then printed on paper to A4 format. The style was then changed in 1972 to the A5 postcard style, for filing purposes, and a few other companies started publishing postcards for the model industry under different trade names since Peter Marlowe had registered the trademark “Model Composite” in Europe and the USA.

Amongst these was Sebastian Sed who traded under the name Sed postcards, which are sometimes mispronounced as Z (“Zed”) or Set Postcards. The publishing house of Marlowe Press stopped trading in 1990 and the words “models composites” and “composites postcards” became generic within the model industry. Composites postcard databases and creation tools have moved online in recent years.

How Composites Postcards Are Used

Composites Postcards have been around for many years as an essential marketing tool for a model, and are likely to retain this standing because they are an inexpensive way to effectively and professionally showcase a model’s ability. Composite postcards are used on three major levels – they are used by models, agents and the agent’s client

How Composites Postcards are produced       

Currently, models have many different options of creating composites postcards. They can ask their photographer or create their own on their computers using image editing or graphics software. In addition, with technology’s increasingly strong influence in the digital market, many printing companies have looked to the internet to facilitate the ordering process. Composites postcard printing prices can vary depending on the number of pictures used on the postcard, the type of paper stock used, and the general printing quality. Different layout styles are available or can be created.

Who are Composites Postcards for?

Composite postcards are essential for business people. They’re an inexpensive and effective way to make a good first impression, to professionally showcase your abilities, and to share your contact information with agencies, scouts, clients, photographers, and other industry professionals. So, any model that is serious about their career, whether it’s commercial, fashion, plus-size, or any other type of modeling, needs to have composite postcards! Keep in mind that if you plan on doing multiple kinds of modeling (like commercial and parts modeling; for example), you’ll need to have a separate composites postcard for each type.

Should You Go for Online Composites postcard or a Printed Composites postcard?

These days, many models use a combination of digital and physical composite postcards. They’re basically the same, but with one obvious difference: One you email and the other you snail mail or hand out.

However, if you are just starting out then an online composite postcard is the way to go. The beauty of an online composite postcard is that you can quickly swap out photos yourself rather than having to reprint hundreds of postcards at the printing company. Online composites postcards are the most inexpensive choice for new models that are often changing their photos in the beginning. Once you become a little more established, then you can invest in printed postcards.

 

All composites postcards, whether they’re online or not, act like mini-portfolios and are a quick and easy way for agencies, scouts, and clients to see what you’re all about as a model, and shows them that you’re serious about a future in modeling. It’s good to have both kinds on hand just in case the recipient prefers one type over the other.

Appearance

The unique thing about these postcards is that, no two composites postcards are identical. Nevertheless, the industry-standard layout includes one large photo (your best one!) and four smaller photos, with your name, details, and contact information at the bottom. Online composites postcards are simply an eye-catching image that contains all of these elements, typically with the large photo on the left and the four smaller ones stacked on the right. Physical composites postcards are typically double-sided (one large photo on the front, smaller photos on the back) and printed on an 8.5″ x 5.5″ piece of glossy cardstock.

In a nutshell, composites postcards are the gateway to landing you the perfect job in the modeling industry. So, if you want to appear professional, take your time to ensure that your composites postcard comes out perfectly.

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards
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What are Art Nouveau Postcards

Example of Art Nouveau Postcard from Wikikart

Postcards are everywhere, and while some are adorable, the rest is just impeccable. But here is what we don’t know. Postcards are of different types. That’s why while one has a specific pattern of design, the other tends to vary. And so, after doing some digging into the different types of postcards, it came as a shock to me that they are a lot more forms than I could have ever imagined. And that’s why today, I will be sharing with you one of the many types of postcards; the Art Nouveau postcards precisely. But to have a better understanding of what this form of the postcard is all about, we are going to first have a look at how Art Nouveau came about, and how an Art Nouveau postcard looks like.

 

History of Art Nouveau

By the late 1800s, art and Europe had taken a decidedly academic turn to be considered. Then, a serious individual artist had to attend one of the many art academies. They needed to commit to a rigorous study of line, shape, form, and texture, with the ultimate goal of producing paintings of idealized figures and landscapes. And of course, for all the artists who did just that, some thought academic art was rubbish and reacted accordingly. They believed art isn’t meant to be studied like science or math. They thought art flows from the soul, twists through the consciousness and decorates life with its beauty.  These rebel artists driven to impart their own style in the art world were the innovators of the very short but highly influential movement known as Art Nouveau.

Lasting from approximately 1890 to 1910, Art Nouveau which means “new art” in French, moved away from imitation of real subjects, and move towards the flowing and twisting lines and shapes of nature. Art Nouveau pieces are organic in their ornamentation, featuring what many art historians call whiplash curves, decorating every available surface. Due to the opening of foreign relations with Japan, the flowing lines of Japanese woodblock prints became a new inspiration for European artists. The simplicity, muted colors enriched two-dimensional imagery, are prominent features of both Japanese prints and Art Nouveau design. Art Nouveau artists were also influenced by the Arts and Crafts movements’ emphasis on hand craftsmanship, and the highly expressive paintings of posts Impressionists. So, what are the characteristics of an Art Nouveau, and how can you know when you see one?

Characteristics of Art Nouveau

Common characteristics of Art Nouveau are muted colors like olive, green, carnation pink, and periwinkle blue writhing and swirling lines, as well as natural imagery, nature illustrations of deep-sea creatures and plants published by biologists, were used as artists reference books. So, let’s look at some examples of an Art Nouveau.

Examples

Firstly, examples of this new art could be found in all art forms during this time, sculpture and painting of course, but also architecture, jewelry, household items, and graphics. The view that sculpture and painting were superior crafts was passionately challenged. This movement brought about interior design as artists strove for harmony and continuity in decor.  These artists wanted to replace the mishmash of mass-produced items antiques and classical imitations with well-made original and coordinated decorations, and furniture.  But it didn’t just stop there, and that’s how the Art Nouveau postcards came into existence.

Art Nouveau Postcards

Art Nouveau was the first artistic movement to give serious credibility to the graphic arts especially the poster as an art form. The immensely popular posters designed by Henri Toulouse-Lautrec for example, contain illustrations and decorative lettering that practically foretells art’s later emphasis on graphic design. In addition to posters, are Novo’s graphics beautified book covers catalogs, and playbills. Louis Comfort Tiffany designs in glass, with her imagery taken directly from the natural world, are also prime examples of Art Nouveau. Tiffany’s stained glass lamps and windows are special because unlike typical stained glass which is created by painting on clear glass, Tiffany’s windows and lamps featured subtly dyed opalescent glass.

The ornamental nature of famed Austrian painter Gustav Klimt, whose work is another example of Art Nouveau at its most dominant his work is decorative, colorful, and contained gold leaf, like in the painting “The kiss and the portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer”, which leave no space unadorned.

The twisting organic lines of Art Nouveau can also be found in the paintings and illustrations of artist Alphonse Mukha, his elongated depictions of actresses and fantasy women, decorated advertisements theater posters, and more. One of Mukah’s best-known works is a set of decorative panels. The seasons which personifies the seasons as sensuous women that illustrate both a character of each season individually, as well as the harmony of seasons throughout the year.

Art Nouveau had a great run and even though it lasted only 20 years, the work produced during this period made a lasting impression on the art world. Towards the end of Art Nouveau, heyday, the prevailing aesthetic, eventually gave way to the more industrial lines of modernism and the more predictable geometric forms of Art Deco. Still, the influence and appreciation of Art Nouveau organic forms and prolific ornamentation has lasted till today, and there are a lot including its postcards. And speaking of postcards;

 

Art nouveau postcards today often range between $4 to $40 depending on the quality and artists. And if you’re looking to get more of such, you can simply do so by logging on to prominent postcards websites like darlenesoldpostcards to check out amazing Art Nouveau postcards of your choice.

 

So all in all, even though Art Nouveau has its history dating far back to the earliest centuries, nevertheless, it is still a much-appreciated art. And that’s clearly why you can find its paintings and postcards, almost everywhere like Italy, Spain Denmark, of course, France, and so on. Do well to check them out, and let us know how well you enjoyed your journey into the wonders of these amazing Art Nouveau postcards.

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards

 

I couldn’t find a Video on Art Nouvea Postcards – But I did find a video on this style of Artwork

 

Art Nouveau Art Style
Art Nouveau Art Style
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What are Court Postcards

Example Court Postcard from Wili

There are different types of elements in this world. And the most important reason why you need to understand how one thing differs from the other is so that you will have a better comprehension of how they operate. We’ve been hearing a lot about cards ever since we were like kids, but what most people like me, failed to understand was that there are other types of cards, other than the cardboard we all know. And I’m talking about types such as court cards. So, what is a court card? And how did it come into existence? Who first used it and why? These and many more we shall be addressing as we go further in this write-up.

 

Origin of Court Cards

Court card or what is sometimes known as court-sized card, was the name given to a postcard, with a size of a picture. Primarily, records have it that it was used in the United Kingdom, measuring approximately 4.75 x 3.5 inches, with a believed standard size of 5.5 x 3.5 inches. Basically, court cards were known to be smaller in size, with a square looking shape, a bit higher than later cards. And it is also believed to have been used from about 1894 to 1902.  In keeping with the regulations of the time, court cards had an un-divided back, which was meant for the address only,  and the message had to be written on the ‘front’ of the court card. But, even though court cards were primarily made use of in the UK, a lot of them were printed by Germany’s chromolithography. Today, a lot of clear examples of these type of cards still exist, and are in high demand from philatelists and postcard collectors.

 

An Overview of Court Cards

Though most of us are quite used to seeing court cards virtually everywhere these days, from souvenir shops to card stores, to museum gift shops, and even at the grocery store, court cards are a relatively recent invention. However as stated earlier, the oldest court card, and what is believed to be the first, was sent in 1840 in England. Generally, most court cards are instantly recognizable because of their square-like shape and thick card stock paper, which is often made for writing and mailing something without an envelope. Of course, there are novelty exceptions to the shape and material with court cards; however, the standard court card type remains the same. Plus, there is even a branch of study today which is focused on collecting and studying court cards, known as deltiology.

Ever since postal services began in various parts of the world, there have been the occasional people who write messages on cards and send them without envelopes. These early examples were always handmade and not of standard size and material construction. What is considered the first official court card as we know them today was a hand-painted design on a card that was created by writer Theodore Hook in London in 1840; he mailed the card to himself, using a black penny stamp. It is believed he created, and mailed the card as a joke to the post office, as the design he painted on it was a caricature of postal workers in a post office. This first court card is now in the hands of a private collector, having sold at auction in 2002 for £31,750, $ 41,275  todays Conversion Rate

The court card made its way to the United States in 1848, with the sending of a card depicting printed advertising. It was a handmade card, like its British predecessor, court cards began being commercially produced in the United States in 1861. The first producer of them was John P. Charlton in Philadelphia, who obtained a patent on his court card design. Charlton soon after sold the rights to his patent to Hyman Lipman. Lipman sold court cards with decorated borders, but no images, and labeled them “Lipman’s postal card.”

In issuing official court cards, England was not far behind the United States. The British post office began issuing court cards without images in 1870, and included a stamp in the design, so buying additional postage was not necessary; the price of the stamp was built into the cost of the court card. There were originally two sizes of cards offered, but the larger one was found to be too difficult to handle by postal workers and was soon discontinued. Thus, the smaller card came into use.

While people had been designing images of their own on-court cards for a while, the first court card sold with a commercially printed image on it was made in France in 1870, by Leon Besnardeau at Camp Conlin. This was a training camp for soldiers who were participating in the Franco-Prussian War. The design of the court card included a picture of piles of weapons on either side of a scroll. The scroll was topped by an image of the arms of the Duchy of Brittany.

In a nutshell, court card postcards can be today be portrayed as the emailing system we operate on now, with the only difference being the internet and interface ( yahoo, Gmail). Prior to the advent of high-class technology, where things such as the internet and smartphones got invented, the art of mailing one another was carried out through the use of court card postcards, which often carried the message and the date at the back of the card. So, if you’ve never seen a court card postcard before, you can logon to postcards gallery websites online like the darlenesoldpostcards.com and check out tons of them there.

Given that they are highly historical, with some of them often being auctioned at a good rate, it is always an amazing sight/plus experience, when you go through the series of ancient court card postcards, with their messages and names written right across the front page of the card. Check them out, and let us know what you think about them in the comment section below. As usual, I wish you happy surfing.

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards