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Old Postcards Brussels Helpful Guide W Pricing

Old Brussels Postcards

We have been Developing a Research tool. to help you Locate and Research Old Brussels Postcards for Collectors

  • Old Brussel Event or Location with Research Link

  • Video Link for Visual Search

  • Highest / Lowest Sold Price

  • Number of Available Vintage Postcards

  • Link to Ebay’s Specific Search – 4 Million Available Postcards

Here are the Most Popular Postcard Subjects, Locations, Events, Cities for Postcard Collectors of Old Brussels Postcards – Facts on each Event

History of Belgium

  • Belgium has land Borders with 4 Countries – Germany, France, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands

  • Belgium has three languages spoken in this Small Country – Belgium, Dutch, and Flemish

  • Have the Famed Cold Springs – Used for Hundreds of Years fro Healing – Word “Spa “ comes from here

  • Belgium is World famous for beer and Chocolate – and is the World’s number 1 exporter of chocolate

  • French Fries are believed to been invented here, and it is the Home of the Belgian Waffles

  • In 1846 – Adolphe Sax – invented the Saxophone

  • More Castles per square Mile than any other country in Europe

  • Oldest free Country in Europe in 1066

  • Home of “ Brussels Sprouts”

  • Has a very high Education rate and children are made to go until they are 18 years old

  • It is against the law not to vote

  • 1st country in the World to issue Electronic Passports

  • Napoleons Final defeat was in waterloo Belgium

  • Because of Lighting, the Belgium Highways can be seen from the Moon

  • Home to seven Monastries was the monks continue to Brew Beer

  • Is the Home of the Worlds largest Diamond Center

Buy Postcard Market Place Flower Carpet Brussel
Buy Postcard Market Place Flower Carpet Brussel

History of Brussels / Bruxelles

  • Saint Gery Built a Chapel in 695AD on Banks of the Senne river

  • City was officially Founded in 979 AD – built near the Senne River – by Charles Duke of lotharingia

  • Revolution in 1830 against the Ruling Dutch

  • First set of City walls were in 11th Century – for protection of the City

  • Duke of Barbant made it the capital for 3 Centuries

  • Rebelled against Rome pre 1500s

  • By 1633 – had a population of 50,000

  • Revolt for Independence against King William of the Netherlands.

  • After the Revolution and Independence was gained population grew to over 120,000

  • Largest City in Belgium

  • Political Capital of Europe – Home of the European Union

  • The airport in Brussels is the Largest Selling Spot of Chocolate in the World

  • Audrey Hepburn Born in Brussels in 1929

  • Home to the deepest indoor swimming pool in the world – 35 meters / 115 Feet Deep many scuba divers train here, has couple artificial caves

Royalty / Government

  • Constitutional Monarchy – Chosen in 1830 upon Independence – Congress nominates

  • King Leopold I ( 1790 – 1865) Married to Charolette of Wales, and also then Louise of Orleans ( They had 4 Children )

  • King Leopold II ( 1835 – 1909) married to Marie Henriette of Austria 9 They had Three Children )

  • Albert I ( 1875 – 1934 ) Married to Elizabeth of Bavaria  ( they had 3 Children )

  • King Leopold III ( 1901 – 1993 ) married to Astrid of Sweden ( They had 3 children ) and also Lillian of Rethey  ( they had 3 Children )

  • King Baudin ( 1930 – 1993 )  married to Fabiola  ( they had 0 children )

  • King Albert II ( 1934 –       )  Married to Paola of Belgium ( they had 3 Children )

  • King Phillipe ( 1960 –       )  married to Mathilde of Belgium  ( they had 4 children )

Royal Palace

  • Built-in 1900 by King Leopold II

  • Was Constructed on the earlier Ruins of the Castles

  • Is open for Tours two weeks out of the year

  • Built-in Shadow of London and France Structures

Kings house

  • Houses the City Museum of Brussels

  • Completely rebuilt in 1873 – 1895

Monuments

  • Antonium – Landmark Building made for Expo 1958 – construction likeness of nine atoms – magnified 165 Billion times – originally designed to last 6 months – still standing today

  • Congress Column – represents the initiation of the First Congress in 1850, when the first stone was set – has a spiral staircase with 193 Steps – No longer able to be visited – originally could hold 16 Tourist

  • Infantry Memorial – In Memory of WWI and WWII Infantry Foot Soldiers who Perished

  • Jeannke – Pis – Citys modern trademark statue – Statue of a small Pig Tail girl peeing on the ground – makes no sense to me……

  • Fountaine Anspach – Tribute to Jules Anspach – Mayor of Brussels in 1863 – 1879

  • Pro Patria – This is the Monument to the Patriots that led the Revolution for Independence

  • Monument of Don Quijote Built-in 1929 – a tribute to

Old Vintage Brussels Postcards Helpful Guide W Pricing

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Belgium Video$ 283.00 / .2534,371Belgium Postcards
BrusselsVideo$ 126.00 / 1.008,401Brussels Postcards
Belgium RoyaltyVideo$ 25.00 / 2.47426Belgium Royalty Postcards
Royal PalaceVideo$ 3.76 / .1786Royal Palace Postcards
Belgium Kings HouseVideo$ 1.95 / .5084Belgium Kings House Postcards
Belgium MonumentsVideo$ 6.52 / .50761Belgium Monuments Postcards
Old Vintage Brussels Postcards Helpful Guide W Pricing
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Old British Postcards Helpful Guide W Pricing

Old British Postcards

Old British Postcards cover 25% of the Worlds population and 25% of the Territory in the World….Check To see some of its Global Influences

We have been Developing a Research tool. to help you Locate and Research Old British Postcards for Collectors

  • Old British Event or Location with Research Link

  • Video Link for Visual Search

  • Highest / Lowest Sold Price

  • Number of Available Vintage Postcards

  • Link to Ebay’s Specific Search – 4 Million Available Postcards

Here are the Most Popular Postcard Subjects, Locations, Events, Cities for Postcard Collectors of Old British Postcards – Facts on each Event

  • British Navy

  • Formed in 1660 – Known as Senior Service – United Kingdoms Naval Warefare Force

  • Was the world’s largest navy till End of WWII when the US Surpassed it.

  • Toward the end of Cold war – turned into mostly Anti – Submarine Sub Hunting Force

  • As of 2016, The British Royal navy has

    • 2 amphibious Transport Docks

    • 4 ballistic Missle Sub marines

    • 7 Nuclear Fleet Submarines

    • 6 guided Missle Destroyers

    • 13 Frigates

    • 15 counter-mine vessels

    • 22 patrol vessels

    • 77 Commissioned Vessels

Old British Postcards of British Navy
Postcards of British Navy

  • Royal Navy was created in 1707 – by the 1707 Acts of Union in Great Britan

  • In 1775 – 1783 in the War for the Early United States – the Early British Navy Obliterated the Small Continental navy of the Americas

  • Scurvy was Eliminated from the British navy in the 1790’s From the work of Gilbert Blane – Lemon Juice

  • During the Industrial revolution – 1859 – Great time of Ship Building – estimated to have the size of 1000 ships.

  • In WWI – British Navy handled the German Blockade – also Mined the North Sea –

  • At the start of WWII the British navy was the Largest in the World it consisted of

    • 7 Aircraft carriers

    • 15 battleships

    • 66 cruisers

    • 184 Destroyers

    • 45 Patrol Vessels

    • 60 Submarines

 

  • British Royalty

    • George I ( 1660 – 1727)   Marrieds to Sophia Dorthea of Brunswick – Luneburg ( 2 children ) – Ruled for 12 Years

    • George II ( 1683 – 1760)  Married to Charlotte of Mecklenburg ( 8 Children) – Strelitz – ruled for 33 Years

    • George III ( 1738 – 1820)  Married to Charlotte of Mecklenburg ( 15 Children)  – Ruled for 59 Years

    • George IV ( 1762 – 1830)  Married to Maria Fitzherbert – No Children, Caroline of Brunswick ( 1 daughter) Ruled 10 Years

    • William IV ( 1765 – 1837)  Married to Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen (  2 Daughters ) Ruled 7 years

    • Queen Victoria (1819 – 1901) Married to Albert of Saxe – Coburg ( 9 Children)  Ruled 63 Years

    • Edward VII ( 1841 – 1910 )  Married to Alexandra of Denmark ( 6 Children)  Ruled 9 years

    • George V ( 1865 – 1936 )  Mary of Teck ( 6 Children) Ruled 25 years

    • Edward VIII ( 1894 – 1972 )  Married to Wallis Simpson ( No Children)  – Abdicated after 326 Days

    • George VI ( 1895 – 1952) Married to Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon ( 2 Daughters) Ruled 15 Years

    • Elizabeth II ( 1926 – still Living) married to Prince Phillip of Greece ( 4 Children ) Ruling Till present 67 Years +

Queen Alwxandra of England Empress Maria of Russia
Queen Alwxandra of England Empress Maria of Russia

 

 

Here is a very abbreviated List of Some of the Most Famous British Actors in the Movie and Theater Industry.  The complete list is very impressive on the number of actors that have contributed to the Movie Industry.  This list is from the Period that Old British Postcards were available.

Buy Postcard Movie Gone with the Wind
Buy Postcard Movie Gone with the Wind

  • British Exhibition

  • Refered to as The Great Exhibition – Crystal Palace Exhibition – held in Hyde Park London United Kingdom in 1851

  • It was the first in a whole series of world fairs

  • It was Organized by Queen Victoria’s Husband – Prince Albert

  • Was Kept in the Crystal Palace – Largest green House in the World – built by architect Joseph Paxton – The Greenhouse was such a success it even rivaled the Exhibition itself

  • Was designed by thin Steel rods that contained plate glass – to create the Green House – 1850 Feet Long and 128 feet High

  • There were 13,000 Exhibits

  • 6 Million People Visited – average daily attendance of approx 40,000 people

  • In India Exhibit – Mountain of light Diamond – Worlds largest diamond

  • The profits from the Exhibition funded – Victoria and Albert Museum, Science Museum, and the Natural History Museum

  • Crystal Palace that was rebuilt was destroyed by fire in 1936

  • The great exhibition was a tribute to the Industrial revolution

  • Was the First International Exhibit of Any Kind

  • Great Inventions of the Times were displayed – Steam Engines-Western Railway locomotive-drills-stamping machines-lathe-Steam tractors.

  • Giant Stuffed Elephant from India – MaCormick Reaper from the US – ice cream machine

Old British Postcards Helpful Guide W Pricing 1

 

British empire

  • Called Largest Empire in the World – said that the Sun never sets on the British Empire

  • By 1913 – controlled over 412 Million people was a quarter of the Worlds population

  • By 1920 it controlled over One-Quarter of The worlds territory

  • Much of English expansion was based on being able to colonize and then Use territories natural resources – Gold – Diamonds-spices – lumber-slaves-cotton-coal-many natural resources

  • If You look at it from a business perspective you have to admire how from a Small Island Country they could Manage so much of the Worlds Population and lands

  • The Caribbean was very Lucrative for England – Sugar plantations ran by Slave labor – sugar was the white Gold

  • Hudson Bay company – which dealt with furs from the Americas and Canada Wildernesses

  • Royal African Company – Which provided Slaves to the Caribbean and the America Plantations

  • British Empire Abolished Slavery in 1807

  • Sports invented by the British – Soccer, Table Tennis, Cricket, Tennis, Hockey, Golf, Rugby

  • English is spoken by over 100 countries, 1 – 2 Billion People – Due to the Global Influence of the British Empire

  • Britain invented and propelled forward the Train and the Telegraph

  • Outlawed in 1829 – Sati – Widow Burning – The Custom that when the Husband would die – The wife would burn herself alive at his burial

  • Old British Empire stood alone against Hitler – Nazi

  • British Empire created a lot of Global wealth – 7 of the Richest Countries in the world – Singapore, Hong Kong, USA, Egypt, Ghana, Sudan, Nigeria, and South Africa

  • She Brought Democracy across the face of the World

  • John Hawkins first recorded Slave trader in 1563

  • First convicts were used to man Plantations – But the need was too great – Slavery became prominent

  • Portugal and Britan were the major Players in the Slave Business – the majority of slaves introduced into the United States were from these two countries

  • Slave ships – were originally cargo ships that were converted to the cargo being slaves nicknamed – Guineamen

  • Description from an eye witness of a Slave ship

  • How many Slaves Died on Slave Ships – Numbers suggest – 1.5 million Slaves died on Ships –

  • Slave Triangle Consisted of Three Major destinations

  • Departing from European Ports – to the West Coast of Africa – Then to the America 6 – 8 month Trip – to sell and exchange slaves for goods – sugar, coffee, tobacco, rice, and Cotton – then back to European ports then the home goods for sale. 1753

Slave Market St Augustine Florida
Slave Market St Augustine Florida

  • British cathedrals

  • 20 Catholic cathedrals in Great Britan –

  • 47 Church of England cathedrals in Great Britan

  • 27 Catholic cathedrals in Ireland

  • 30 Church of God Cathedrals in Ireland

Old British cathredrals Postcards
Old British cathedrals Postcards

 

  • British Post office

  • When it began – Money was paid by the receiver – the Letter not buying postage

  • Penny Black Stamp – was the first Paid postage – Mail now could be sent free to the Receiver in Stamp was present in 1840

  • 0ver 200 British Mailboxes were painted Gold after Britains win in 2012 Olympics

  • At one time 2 million Old British Postcards were delivered Daily – at one-time mail was delivered 7 times a day

  • Originated in 1616 by King Charles II

  • The invention of the adhesive postage stamp in 1837 – it was by Sir Roland hill

  • In 1914 the British Post Office had over 250,000 people a combination of Military and workers

 

  • British Museum

  • British Museum was founded in 1753

  • Had its own Subway – Tube station for over 30 Years

  • One of the First Buildings to have Electric Lights

  • Its whole Collection was moved for safety during in WWII in Bombproof Shelters

  • Is Englands most popular Tourist Attraction – 6.5 Million Visitors a year

 

Collector Research Tools

Old Vintage British Postcards Helpful Guide W Pricing

Old British PostcardsVideo$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Cards
British ExhibitionVideo$ 50.00 / .38681British Exhibition Postcards
British NavyVideo$ 60.00 / .25530British Navy Postcards
British RoyaltyVideo$ 20.00 / .95175British Royalty Postcards
British EmpireVideo$ 50.00 / 1.32243British Empire Postcards
British CathedralsVideo$ 16.49 / .9965British Cathedrals Postcards
British Post OfficeVideo$ 32.94 / .25118British Post Office Postcards
British MuseumsVideo$ 98.95 / 1.19365British Museums Postcards
British WWIVideo$ 75.00 / .95848British WWI Postcards
British WWIIVideo$ 31.00 / .99285British WWII Postcards
British RailVideo$ 54. 00 / 1.2591British Rail Postcards
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Old Postcards United Kingdom / UK/ England History

DateEventsDescriptionNumber of PostcardsEbay Postcards Over 4 Million PostcardsLink
1863First Underground Train - London PostcardsFirst In London8Postcards
1912Stainless Steel PostcardsInvented
1914English WWI Postcards
Enters WWI
Enters war228Postcards
1939English WWII Postcards
Enters WWII
Enters war69Postcards
1979Margaret Thatcher PostcardsBecome Prime Ministers6Postcards
1985Bradford Fire PostcardsStadium Fire3Postcards
1996UEFA Euro 1996 PostcardsEngland Host30Postcards
1997Tony Blair Prime Minister Postcards35Postcards
1997Diana Dies PostcardsPrincess Diana of Wales696Postcards
2003England Wins Rugby Cup PostcardsDefeating Austrailia36Postcards
2005Bombing Londons Subways PostcardsPublic Transportation30Postcards
20122012 Summer Olympics PostcardsLondon28Postcards

 

United Kingdom City Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

United Kingdom Cities PostcardsCountryAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Cards
Birmingham England PostcardsEngland$ 6.50$ 496.78 / .992,821Postcards
Leeds England PostcardsEngland$ 6.61$ 92.43 / .21645Postcards
Glasgow Scotland PostcardsScotland$ 7.02$ 860.00 / .311,313Postcards
Sheffield England PostcardsEngland$ 14.99$ 87.43 / .017744Postcards
Manchester England PostcardsEngland$ 9.52$ 80.42 / .065,566Postcards
Edinburgh Scotland PostcardsScotland$ 5.99$ 76.48 / 1.692,060Postcards
Liverpool England PostcardsEngland$ 3.51$ 104.38 / .451,362Postcards
Bristol England PostcardsEngland$ 5.78$ 75.00 / .793,524Postcards
Cardiff Wales PostcardsWales$ 5.30$ 116.58 / .11386Postcards
Belfast Ireland PostcardsIreland$ 4.64$ 399.00 / .091,596Postcards
Leicester England PostcardsEngland$ 5.99$ 47.36 / .17465Postcards
Wakefield England PostcardsEngland$ 4.95$ 25.00 / .06690Postcards
Coventry England PostcardsEngland$ 6.88$ 53.99 / .06406Postcards
Nottingham England PostcardsEngland$ 7.03$ 37.09 / .25388Postcards
New Castle England PostcardsEngland$ 4.92$ 136.35 / >063,489Postcards
Sunderland England PostcardsEngland$ 8.00$ 95.38 / .11246Postcards
Brighton England PostcardsEngland$ 9.99$ 198.70 / .112,035Postcards
Kingston England PostcardsEngland$ 3.86$ 55.00 / .013,354Postcards
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UK Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth
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Old Vintage Italy City Postcard Helpful Guide W Pricing

Old Postcards Italy

We have been Developing a Research tool. to help you Locate and Research Old Italy Postcards for Collectors

  • Italian City with Research Link

  • Video Link for Visual Search

  • Highest / Lowest Sold Price

  • Number of Available Vintage Postcards

  • Link to Ebay’s Specific Search – 4 Million Available Postcards

Here are the Most Popular Postcard Subjects, Locations, Castles, Cities for Postcard Collectors in the Country of Italy – Facts on each Ruin

 

Postcards from Historical ruins in Italy

Postcard Location of   Ostia Antica

  • Located on the mouth of the Tiber River

  • Rome made it a Naval base on 400 AD built by Claudius – said to be Rome’s’ first Colony

  • Main Importance has been the Salt Flats – where for hundreds of years Salt Business for meat preservation

  • Host 200 Graves / Tombs

 

Postcards Location of Pompeii

  • It seems to be Originally a Greek City / Before Rome because of the Greek architecture that is there.

  • 79 AD was when Mt Vesuvius erupted. Pliny wrote about it watching from across the Bay of Naples

  • Normally the wind blows away from Pompeii, but then must have been moving toward it.

  • Was discovered in 1599 and excavations began I 1700s – When excavation they found empty spaces in the hardened ash – they injected plaster to form the shapes of trapped people,

  • The current excavation site covers 150 Acres

  • Vesuvius erupted again in 1944 and at that time it Killed 26 People.

  • Wealthy Holiday Location for Romans

  • In AD 66 there was an earlier earthquake that disrupted the Citys piping for its water system – an early sign

  • It is recorded that the eruption lasted for 24 hours

  • Today it is still Considered an active Volcano

  • Guesstimates are that 2,000 – 16,000 people lost their lives – they have archaeologically found 1500 bodies

  • Had one of the oldest Roman Amphitheaters built in 70 BC – Seating Capacity of Approx 20,000

  • No One ever returned to inhabit the City except Looters

  • Some of the Skeltons found – had perfect teeth – scientist think because of the high fluoride content around the volcano

  • Currently, Scientist feel only 2/3 rds of City have been discovered

  • Its nickname is City of the Dead

  • Tourist attraction over 2.5 million have visited the site

  • 25 Buildings have been excavated that scientist believed were used for prostitution

Old Vintage Italy City Postcard Helpful Guide W Pricing 2

Old Vintage Italy City Postcard Helpful Guide W Pricing 3

Postcard Location of Colosseum

  • Roman Emporer Vespasian built in 70AD, it was opened by his son Titus – it was originally named Flavian Amphlipheater

  • Was once 100 ft Statue of Nero was there also –

  • Original Location of Nero’s Golden Hose of Pleasure. Had an artificial Lake there it was filled and is the foundation of the Colosseum

  • Was the Largest Colosseum built by the Romans to date –  615’ x 510’ x 157’ High

  • Could seat 50,000 with 14” per bottom

  • 9,000 Animals were killed for the show during the Colosseums opening – 11,000 during 3 day festival of Emporer Trajan

  • Been Used for Gardens, Merchants, in 16th Century – Pope tried to make it into Wool Factory

  • Was selected as one of the seven wonders of the World

  • Took 60,000 slaves to build it – underground tunnels and holding chambers – for animals and slaves – gladiator preparations

  • It is estimated 400,000 people died there – 1,000,000 animals over – during a span of 390 Years

Nimes Collesium Lions Romans France
Nimes Collesium Lions Romans France

 

Postcard Location of Facts About  Capuchin crypt

  • Crypt was built between 1626 – 1631 by Pope Urban VIII for some of the wealthiest families

  • Estimated 4,000 buried there

  • Corridor with 6 rooms – the crypt of the Skulls – Crypt of the Pelvises – Crypt of the Leg Bones – Crypt of Thigh Bones –

  • Built by Capuchin Order of Priests

Postcard Location of Pianosa Island

  • Home of Posthumus lived there 14AD until he was assassinated by Tiberius

  • 400 catacombs have been discovered there

  • Was a Penal Island or Prison – once housed 149 prisoners. In 188 – had 960 prisoners –

  • WWII Island was Bombed

  • Was a prison fortress – until 1997

 Postcard Location of Claudio Aqueduct

  • Ancient Roman Aqua duct – built in and finished in 52 AD

  • Total length of 43 Miles – much of it was underground – Nero extended the Aquaduct to supply 14 Roman Districts

 

Postcard Location of Herculaneum

  • Roman town also destroyed when Mt Vesiupius Erupted

  • Excavations have found 300 Skeletons

  • Established at the Bay of Naples in 600 BC –

  • Estimated Population of 20,000 people

  • Many of the structures were covered from Boiling Mud from the eruption

  • Excavations began in 1738 by Spanish Archaeologists

  • The city was wealthier than Pompeii – many of the Hoses were on the Waterfront

  • Many of the bodies were found in the Boathouses – being analyzed points toward instant death because of intense heat.

 

Postcard location of Paestum

  • Greeks founded in 600 BC – Main God was Hera – Goddess of Fertility – Temple built there in 550 BC – Temple of Neptune, Temple of Ceres – Temple of Hera II –

  • Romans moved in and named it Paestum –

  • Had a Forum, Amphitheater, Gymnasium,

  • Built-in Doric Order – Style of Architecture

  • Temple Housed –the Statue of Zeus – One of the Seven Wonders of the World – he was the Most Powerful Greek Gods – Went to Live in Mt Olympus – Married Hera

  • Zeus third wife – Mnemosyne – gave birth to Nine Muses –

Postcard Location of Leaning Tower of Pisa

  • Bell Tower in Southern Italy – Seven bells – was built on Soft soil and Begun Leaning

  • The tower is 8 Stories Tall

  • Started in 1173 and was finished ny 1372 – constructions were interrupted by War

  • Partially restored by 1990 – 2001, was leaning over 5 degrees, after Restoration leaning 3.9 degrees

  • 294 steps on one side – 296 steps on the other

  • The foundation is built on Marshy subsoil – the foundation is 9 feet Thick

  • Germans used it as a lookout tower in WWII – Allies did not Bomb it because of its Historical Significance

  • Pisa built with Stolen money – Built to display wealth from pillage of Palmero

  • Mussolini – tried to make repairs by drilling hole in foundation and pumping in concrete

  • Lean has switched directions over time

  • You can go up it today

 

Old Vintage Italy City Postcard Helpful Guide W Pricing 4

Postcard Location of Hadrians Villa

  • Built by Roman Emporer Hadrian in 117 AD in Tivoli as his personal Villa

  • Had over 30 buildings – built as his personal retreat from Rome

  • At End of his Reign – he governed Rome from Here

  • Contains Pools – Baths – Gardens – Water was fed by roman Aquaducts

  • Contains mariTime theater – which had a library – lounge – Heated baths – Art Gallery and fountain

  • Warwick vase – painting of Death of Cleopatra – Relief of “Battle of the Centaurs”

 

Postcards from Historical ruins in Italy

Old Vintage Italy Ruins Postcard Helpful Guide W Pricing

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Ostia AnticaVideo$ 18.00 / 1.107Ostia Antica Postcards
PompeiiVideo$ 23.98 / .99223Pompeii Postcards
ColosseumVideo$ 16.00 / 2.28269Colosseum Postcards
Capuchin cryptVideo00Capuchin crypt Postcards
Pianosa IslandVideo00Pianosa Island Postcards
Claudio AqueductVideo04Claudio Aqueduct Postcards
HerculaneumVideo$ 2.5911Herculaneum Postcards
PaestumVideo$ 11.00 / 1.10125Paestum Postcards
Leaning Tower of PisaVideo$ 4.99 / .1659Leaning Tower of Pisa Postcards
Hadrians VillaVideo00Hadrians Villa Postcards
Old Vintage Italy Ruins Postcard Helpful Guide W Pricing
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It will show you Current Listings
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Postcards from Historical Cities in Italy

Old Vintage Italy City Postcard Helpful Guide W Pricing

Italian City Video$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Cards
RomeVideo$ 49.95 / 2.9913,412Rome Postcards
MilanVideo$ 97.50 / 1.003,855Milan Postcards
NaplesVideo$ 40.95 / .992,891Naples Postcards
TurinVideo$ 63.75 / 1.00944Turin Postcards
PalermoVideo$ 59.95 / .25982Palermo Postcards
GenoaVideo$ 51.01 / .251,390Genoa Postcards
BolognaVideo$ 30.00 / 1.00465Bologna Postcards
FlorenceVideo$ 16.50 / .604,573Florence Postcards
BariVideo$ 12.99 / 1.00164Bari Postcards
CataniaVideo$ 9.50 / .9892Catania Postcards
VeniceVideo$ 38.20 / 1.997,689Venice Postcards
TerniVideo$ 5.19 / 1.2555Terni Postcards
LuccaVideo$ 9.99 / .75105Lucca Postcards
MarsalaVideo4 59.99 / 1.2511Marsala Postcards
Old Vintage Italy City Postcard Helpful Guide W Pricing
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It will show you Current Listings
Dollar Amounts are Ebays Actual Sold Amounts - Not asking Price

 

 

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Old Postcards Ireland Helpful Guide W Pricing

Old postcards from ireland

We have been Developing a Research tool. to help you Locate and Research Old Ireland Postcards for Collectors

  • German City with Research Link

  • Video Link for Visual Search

  • Highest / Lowest Sold Price

  • Number of Available Vintage Postcards

  • Link to Ebay’s Specific Search – 4 Million Available Postcards

Here are the Most Popular Postcard Subjects, Locations, Castles, cities for Postcard Collectors in the Country of Ireland

The Cliffs of Moher

Located on the West Coast of Ireland.  They were the home of a Fort in Ancient times.  The Name Means “ Mothar” in Galic – Ruin of a fort.  They are about 5 miles long and about 700 feet high.  Many Tourist visit each Year to climb and then take in the Breathtaking View.

Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin

Now it is a museum but at one time was the former prison for Kilmainham Ireland.

  • Built-in 1796 by the Grand jury of Dublin

  • Operated as a Prison until 1924 – it kept Men, Women, and Children and also Political Prisoners – restoration began in 1960

  • Movies that were Filmed there – The Italian Job – The Quare Fellow – The Face of Fu Manchu

  • James Conolly died there by Firing Squad

The Ring of Kerry

  • Tallest Mountain in Ireland to be Scaled

  • Takes 4 hours to drive around by Car

  • Torc waterfall

  • Malls Gap

  • Skellig Islands

  • Sneem

Glendalough, Co. Wicklow

  • Bell Towers a place of Refuge and hidings in fir Monks.

  • Lookout Post

  • Alarm Tower

  • Founded by Saint Kevin 1825 – 1957

 

The Rock of Cashel

  • Cashel of the kings

  • Legend is that Saint Patrick banned Satan fro the cave.

  • Queen Elizabeth II visited in 2011

  • Castle of the kings of Munster

  • Also Known as St Patricks Rock

Blarney Castle and the Blarney Stone

  • Blarney Stones Powers legend says come from a witch

  • Kissing it gives you the Gift of Gab

  • Also, Witches Kitchen and Kissing Steps are here

  • Original Castle dates as early as 1200, then built upon by MacCarthy of Muskerry Family

  • Attacked during the Confederate wars in 1696

  • Tourist Attraction now

Old Postcards of ireland Blarney castle
Old Postcards of ireland Blarney castle

Kinsale, Co. Cork

  • Know for its attractive shops and historic shopping

  • Age is back to its original charter in 1333

  • Location of the battle of Kinsale in 1601

  • By the River Bandon

Bunratty Castle

  • Irelands Most complete standing Castle

  • 3 floors, 2 Towers, 1 Great Hall

  • Built-in 1250 by Robert Muskcegros – then built into the stone castle by Thomas De Clare

  • It is open to public for Tours and medieval Banquets

 

Dunluce Castle

  • Ruined Castle Currently

  • Earl of Ulster/ McQuillan family helped expand and build the castle in 1513

  • Famous Chiefton Warrior – Sorley Boy McDonald.

  • Originally was an earlier Fort Site of Vikings

  • 1584 a ship from Spanish Armada crashed on Rocks – they too the goods and installed its cannon in the castle.

  • Abandoned in 1690 at the Battle of Boyne

Ross Castle

  • Built-in the early 1500s by Donahue Family

  • Last to surrender in the Confederate Wars

  • Attacked by 4000 Footmen and 200 Horses

  • Only Fell as they brought in Artillery via the River Laune

Dunguaire Castle

  • Built-in 1520 by Martins of Galway

  • The name comes from Dun King of Guaire

  • Open to Public

Cahir Castle

  • Built-in 1142 by Cannon O Brien

  • Given to James Butler in 1375

  • Captured by Earl of Sussex after 3-day siege in 1599

  • Used as battle Scene for Movie “Excalibur”

Buy Postcard Castle Carrigglas Manor Longford Ireland
Buy Postcard Castle Carrigglas Manor Longford Ireland

Malahide Castle

  • Built-in 1185 by Richard Talbot, and had acreage of 260 acres

  • Where Miles Corbet was Hanged

  • During WWI it was used to Moor Giant Airships

  • Now owned by the Irish State

Minard Castle

  • Built-in 1800s

  • House Reconstructed in 1842

  • The 1940s used as a Hotel

Old Vintage Ireland Castles Postcard Helpful Guide W Pricing

Ireland Castles Video$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Cards
Rock of CashelVideo$ 6.23 / 1.2935Rock of Cashel Postcards
Blarney castleVideo$ 5.37 / .99254Blarney castle Postcards
Kinsale castleVideo$ 17.86 / .990Kinsale castle Postcards
Burratty castleVideo$ 15.50 / .6821Burratty castle Postcards
Dunluce castleVideo$ 3.99 / 1.2932Dunluce castle Postcards
Ross castleVideo$ 7.00 / .25138Ross castle Postcards
Dunguaire CastleVideo01Dunguaire Castle Postcards
Cahir CastleVideo02Cahir Castle Postcards
Malahyde castleVideo00Malahyde castle Postcards
Minard castleVideo00Minard castle Postcards
Cliffs of MoherVideo$ 7.00 / .2128Cliffs of Moher Postcards
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Cities of interest for Postcards Collectors

Armagh

  • The city is church capital of Ireland for 1500 years

  • The seat of archbishops of Armagh

  • The seat of Primates for All Ireland for Roman Catholic Church and also the Church of Ireland

  • Two famous Cathedrals – Saint Patrick cathedrals

  • Known as Orchard County – because of the Great number of orchards

  • Was earlier used as Capital of Ulster

  • Raided by Vikings in 839

  • Book of Armagh came from the Monastery – some of the oldest writings of Ireland

  • Royal School founded here in 1608

Belfast

  • Irelands Largest City

  • Home of Giants Ring

  • Became worlds largest producer of linen during US Civil War – nicknamed – “Linenopolis”

  • Home of Cavehill – thought to inspire Gulliver Travels

  • Birthplace of Titanic in 1912

  • Belfast – means Rivermouth – the mouth of the sand-bank ford

  • In 1970,1980s home of Troubles – known as the Most Dangerous City in World

  • Major Seaport

  • Started by a grant in 1880 by Queen Victoria

  • Remains of Iron Age Forts still Visible

 Derry

  • Also known as Londonderry

  • Home of 17th Century Derrys Walls with seven gates

  • Second largest City in Northern Ireland

  • Old City lies on West Bank of Foyle River

  • One of the Oldest continually Lived in Cities in Ireland

  • Attacked by Sir Cahir ODaughtery – who burnt most of the city in 1608

  • Being Preserved are the Gates – Bishop’s Gate, Ferryquaye Gate, Shipquay Gate, Butcher’s Gate

  • First Bridge Built-in 1790 across River Foyle

  • During WWII Ships from Royal Navy, Canadian Royal Navy, United States navy was Stationed Here

  • At end of WWII and Germany’s surrender – it harbored 60 U-Boat Submarines of the Kriegsmarine – Germanys navy

 Lisburn

  • Birthplace of Irelands Linen Business in 1698 by Louis Crommelan

  • Lisburn square was constructed in 2003

  • In 1609 Originally a Fort By Sir Fulke Conway

  • Had a Protected Nuclear Bunker during the Cold war

  • Conway castle built in 1627

  • Town reduced to ashes in 1641 – during the fighting

  • 1762 over 300 Weavers were displayed their wares

  • An outbreak of Cholera – 1830

  • 1623 beginning build of the great Church of Ireland.

 

Newry

  • Divided by Clayrne River

  • Founded in 1144 next to a Monastery

  • Started as a market town and a Garrison

  • Its name means “Grove of yew Trees” – From when Legend says Saint Patrick Planted a yew Tree There

  • Violence during the “Troubles” – car Bombings

 

Cork

  • Cork harbor –is the Second Largest in the world

  • 3rd largest city in Ireland

  • Home of Yacht Club founded in 1720

  • First Potatoe Planted here in 1588

  • Last Place the Titanic Docked before she sank

  • Home to the 13 Arch Bridge – the Narrowest and oldest bridge still in use in Europe

  • Home of First Ford Motor company factory outside the US

  • St Colman’s cathedral has 49 Bells the most in Europe.

 Dublin

  • Capital of Dublin on the mouth of Riffey River

  • Home of Dublin castle

  • Has the youngest population in Europe – 50% under 25

  • Dublin has 666 pubs

  • Home of brazen head Pub Opened in 1198

  • Founded by Vikings

  • The Name Dublin means “Black Pool” – is where the poodle stream met the Riffey River and formed a Hole at Dublin Castle.

  • Home of “Book of Knells”

Old Postcards Ireland Helpful Guide W Pricing 5

Galway

  • Founded on the mouth of River Corrib

  • Festival Capital of Ireland 122 – Festivals each year

  • Fort originally built in 1124- town created by Richard de Burgh in 1232

  • Galway’s name means –“ Stony river”

  • Song created by Ed Sheran – “ Galway Girl”

  • Nelson Mandella – Former President of South Africa – Graduated from the National University of Ireland in Galway

  • Galway also called – city of tribes – 14 Families

 

Limerick

  • Beside the Shannon river

  • Home to Saint Johns Castle

  • Name is thought to mean – Barren Piece of Land

  • Last man Executed in Ireland was in Limerick in 1954

  • In History called – City of sieges – 1642, 1650-51, 1690,1691

  • Living Bridge – longest pedestrian Bridge in Ireland – 350 meters – 1148 feet

Waterford

  • Irelands Oldest city founded in 914 by the Vikings

  • Home of Reginald’s Tower

  • Home of Waterford Crystal in 11783

  • Famous – Robert Boyle – father of chemistry, ETS Walton first Irishman to receive Nobel Prize

  • On the Suir River

Old Vintage Ireland City Postcard Helpful Guide W Pricing

Ireland City Video$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Cards
ArmaghVideo$ 24.99 / 1.6946Armagh Postcards
Belfast.Video$ 186.94 / .25625Belfast. Postcards
Derry.Video$ 34.44 / 3.2553Derry. Postcards
Lisburn.Video$ 2.585Lisburn. Postcards
NewryVideo$ 4.73 / 2.0029Newry Postcards
CorkVideo$ 125.00 / 1.99957Cork Postcards
DublinVideo$ 43.89 / .431,573Dublin Postcards
GalwayVideo$ 72.06 / .23260Galway Postcards
LimerickVideo$ 37.13 / .99104Limerick Postcards
WaterfordVideo$ 14.95 / .10129Waterford Postcards
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postcards of isle of wight

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Postcard History of The Isle of Wight

Beautiful Beaches  The largest island, and second most population of England. It is located off the South Coast of England.   Been a resort island for Hundreds of years.  Its population in 2011 was 141,000 on this Island.  Has great Beaches Mild climate.  Been perfect for Boating and Regattas for several hundred years.

The Island has been home to many Famous people.  The Poets Tennyson and Swinburne, and also to Queen Elizabeth.  She built her summer home here, and also her final residence at Cowes.

It has been a place of great boat building, Sail Building, hovercraft, and Britans Space Rockets.

 

Towns of Isle of Wight

  • Newport

You can still see the Remains of the Roman Occupation of the Island. Located in the area called the Medina – two Villas remain.  It was incorporated as a Borough in 1608 – then as Borough of Medina in 1975.  The Isle of Wight Festival is held every year.  It is also the home of the Newport Football Club.  It also contains Isle of Wight cricket grounds. In the 2011 census, the population is about 26,000 people.  You can also visit the Quaye Arts Center. Also the Queen Victoria Memorial.

 

  • Brading

It was in times past called “ Kynges Towne “  there is the Historic Town Hall that is near to the church it was built in 1903.  This is also the location of the “ Bull Ring” This was an old sport.  Where a Bull was tethered to the ring, the attacked by dogs.  At the end of the sport, the meat of the animal would be donated to the poor.

You can also see the Town Gun – It was never fired in action but was made in 1549 by the Owens Brothers.  They had prepared for the French Invasion.  Years later they took it to a celebration and decided to fire it.  ( 1832)  It exploded and split the Barrel.

You can also see the Lilliput Doll and Toy Museum.  There is the Roman Villa at Morton, Brading Waxworks Museum, Also the Sun Dial is there also.

  • Cowes

It is located on the West bank of The Medina River.  It has two parts of the town, one on the east side one on the west they are connected by the Cowes Floating Bridge and a Ferry that runs back and forth.  It is home to the World’s oldest regatta – boat race it takes place in the first week of August every year and has been going on since 1815.

There are several Forts and Castles made around the time of the French Invasion.

  • Henrician castle

  • Tudor Towers

  • Cowes castle

Cowes has been known as a world-renowned center for Boat Building.  Called the Yachting Capital of the World since the days of King George

Three of the Opium Clippers ( Ships) were Built-in Cowes

  • Nina – 1852

  • Eamont – 1853

  • Wild Dayrell – 1854

The town still is important in Boatmaking even to the testing of New Hovercraft.

 

  • Ryde

In 2011 it had a population of around 32,000 and is known as being a seaside resort.  When the Tide goes out it has great expanses of beaches.  It has a Ferry service to England.  The town has the Town Hall built in 1829 and several Victorian Houses still standing.  Today it still has ferry service plus hovercraft service to the South sea.

It is a large attraction for tourists who wants a day walking tour or excursion.  Swimming Pool and Bowling Alley plus many Playgrounds for the Children.  You can see Ryde Castle.  Two festivals Mardi Gra, and Ryde Carnival that has close to 50,000 visitors per year.

John Lenon  (1940 – 1980)   and Paul McCartney (1942- ) from Here

 

  • Sandown

A seaside resort with 21,000 population in 2011.  Sandown is named and known for its long sandy beaches.  Sandown bay has the Longest unbroken Beaches in England.    Home of nature reserves – great Bird watching.  Also, a petrified forest that comes up from the Bay.

Home of Sundown castle built for the French Invasion constructed in 1545.  There are Plans to open a Priemere Inn in 2020.

Other Hotels

  • Travel Inn

  • Holiday Inn

  • Express Holiday Inns

  • Hemel Hempstead

Also Isle of Wight Zoo, Dinosaur Isle.

    • Shanklin

This the furthest south of

  • Three settlements on the Bay.  It is on the coast of Sundown Bay.  It has several Seafront hotels, Seaside cafes and restaurants   Its main attractions are

  • Old Village

  • Shanklin Chine – very green  clifts and trails –waterfalls – paid attraction

  • Clock tower

They Have local Shops, and craft centers, clothing and sports shops.  They also have a Shanklin Theater.  You can take the Sandown bay Bus tour that also takes you through Shanklin.

  • Ventnor

In 2011 Ventnor had a population of 6,000 natural inhabitants.  Become known as famous health and Holiday Location.  It was called the “ English Medertanean”,  “ Mayfair by the Sea”

Because of the towns naturally, protect climate it allows sub tropical Plant to grow.  They have Ventnor Botanic gardens.  In its early years, it only consisted of a few fishermen and one from.  They had a Water Mill for some time.

During WWII it was bombed repeatedly.  The English had a Radar station there.  Ventnor Radar Station.  Most of the structures of the town had been destroyed.  Today the Town has many small shops that are opened seasonally for Tourist trade.

They also have a Theater Carnaval every year – art –theater – comedy

  • Yarmouth

The population in 2011 was 865 people.  Located on the Mouth of the Small Western Yar River

Old Postcards Isle of Wight Helpful Guide W Pricing

Postcards Isle of WightVideo$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Cards
Postcards Isle of WightVideo$ 53.23 / .69944Postcards Isle of Wight
NewportVideo$ 10.33 / .9724Newport Postcards
BradingVideo$ 8.76 / 1.6915Brading Postcards
CowesVideo$ 29.99 / .7873Cowes
RydeVideo$ 34.88 / .6564Ryde
SandownVideo$ 18.17 / 1.2965Sandown
ShanklinVideo$ 14.22 / 1.79161Shanklin
VentnorVideo$ 8.00 / 1.9588Ventnor
YarmouthVideo$ 1.298Yarmouth Postcards
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Vintage Postcards about Women Locator W Pricing

Postcards about women

We have been Developing a Research tool. to help you Locate and Research Postcards about Women for Postcard Collectors

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Here is a List and Short Biography of Some of the Most Important Woman in Their Quest for Equality and Human Rights Throughout our Modern History

1905 Bertha von Suttner

Bertha becomes the first woman to win a Nobel Peace Prize

Bertha had a deep belief that everybody could change they can all change for the better.  Her mother was a widow in she had gambled away their fortune so Bertha was penniless.  She went to work in Paris for the man who invented dynamite, Alfred Nobel.  She wrote a novel called lay down your arms describing how terrible the war was.  Who book became an instant success it was a bestseller all over the world are the United States in Europe also and because of the reputation that she got from the selling of that book he began to be listened to and have influence from all over the world.    She had great influence in her life over Alfred Nobel and he left and in his will the money that provides for the Nobel Peace Prize which is awarded for peaceful efforts of people trying to avoid war and conflict.

1911 First International Women’s Day

This day originally was created to celebrate the accomplishments in work in the politics of women around the world.  And also look at things that they still face across the face of the world globally.  Much of it originated with Clara Zeldin – a german woman who led women to be able to be allowed to work equally with a man, with that she asked for equal pay.  Feeling that is women could be allowed to enter the workforce.  That in itself would raise their standard of living.  The initial rally took place in New York in 1911 in it was all women suffrage March that thousands and thousands of women took part in that time that they had not been set for the international day yet.

1932 Alexandra Kollontai

She is appointed ambassador from the Soviet Union to Sweden. She was also considered the first woman ambassador.

She was the leading woman in Russian politics.   she has kicked out a politics.  After she publicly clashed with Lennon.  In a communist society men and women should be Equal.  She was the most vocal woman in all Russian politics.  She felt that communism was the best way to move forward on women’s rights, women’s family and children’s rights.  Even though there was difficulty with Lynn and she became one of the first women of ambassadors of Russia.  She died in 1952 in Moscow.

1945 Eleanor Roosevelt

After the Death of Teddy, Elanor becomes the American delegate for the recently formed United Nations. In 1946 she is elected as the head of the United Nations Human Rights Commission. She is instrumental and is chairperson of the committee for drafting the Declaration of Human Rights.

After World War 2 was finished there was a great universal desire in spirit for people to figure out how they could avoid the desire for peace in unity was great at that time.  The United States Eleanor Roosevelt was spearheading this cause.

After her husband died requested many times run for the Senate.   also, it was even suggested that she run for vice president because you’d experience she had during the war 3 effects of the war.  She had traveled to so many different parts of the world.  Harry Truman offers her a position in the United Nations as one of the delicates, the first woman.  She wanted to build a movement for peace and also human rights.  They put her on a committee,  supposing that that would kind of take her out of where all action was,  but actually that’s where she excelled and that committee became the most important committee.   And Was coming up with documentation human rights.    Shortly after that, they elected her as chairperson of that committee.  She was a key driver in the Draft of the Declaration of Human rights.

 

China, Lebanon, France, India committee persons all had differences of opinion as they worked through the differences.  Instead of all men being equal, she put in all human beings are created Equal.  Which included women and children.  Adopted Dec 25th 1948.  Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

1958 Swedish diplomat Agda Rössel

Agda was the first woman to head a permanent delegation to the United Nations.

She was a Swedish Politician and Ambassador.  She was the first woman to be appointed in the United Nations in the Year of 1958, She was a permanent Ambassador to Various Countries like Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, and Greece.  She was born in a small Mining Village in Sweden, her father was a Railway Worker.  She had five brothers and sisters.  She was a good student and wanted to become a doctor but had to change direction to come home and help her parents in their illness.

1971 Helga Pederson.

She was a Danish Politician Chief Justice.  And she became the first female Judge on The European Court of human rights.

1973 Tennis star Billie Jean King

Billie King wins the “battle-of-the-sexes” tennis match against Bobby Riggs. The event is highly publicized and serves as inspiration for demands for equal rights and opportunities for female athletes. 90 Million people watched this event at home on their television, in this sports match.  She was the reigning Wimbledon Champion, and she was fightings for women’s equal pay.  Bobby Riggs ( He was 55 Years Old) challenges her to the world-renown Battle of the sexes.  She was a 29-year-old crusader for woman’s fairness and rights.  On her entrance, she was carried and pulled in by a chariot of men – the men’s University track team.

Bobby in the same type of show was led in by a harem of young attractive women.  Totally emphasizing the prejudice of both genders at that time in history.  It was monumental for women.

1974 Isabel Martínez de Perón

She was elected as the first woman becomes President of Argentina in 1974 – 1976.  Her Husband Juan, ( she was 35 years younger than Juan) she helped him as First Lady, and also Vice President.  When her husband died (he died of a heart attack) she became the very first woman to hold the title of President. In 1976 there was a military takeover and she was placed in House arrest for 5 years.  Then later she was exiled to Spain.

.

1975 – Margaret Thatcher

Margaret Roberts Thatcher is elected Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, she becomes Europe’s first female elected head of state.   She was born in Grantham England.  She had high values and her family were groceries in the town.  She went to school in Oxford and she graduated with a degree in Chemistry.  As she was working as a chemist she studied for her law degree and then through her self drive passed the bar.  Through her strong values, she rose politically in England parliament.  She was adamant for free capitalism and she opposed any form of communism.

Margaret was so vocal against communisms, that the soviet press labeled her as the “Iron Lady”.  During the Falkland War, she sent the British navy to protect the citizen’s freedom.   She was trying to implement a tax which eventually led to her resignation.

1986 Maria Corazon Aquino

She became the first female President of the Philippines and also the first female president in Asia.  She was elected as their 11th President.  She also described herself as a “Plain Housewife”  She took office after her husband was assassinated.  In her time of office, she put through legislation that would limit the power of the office of the presidency and gave strength to a Democratic parliament Congress.  Her rise to the presidency has been labeled the most “ Peaceful Revolution

1997 Jenny Shipley

She was the first Woman that is elected Prime Minister of New Zealand.  She was a schoolteacher and rose up through politics in new Zealand.  She was Nicknamed

The Perfumed Steamroller”  she met with President “Bill Clinton”

 

2004 Wangari Maathai,

African Woman she was a Kenyan environmental activist, is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She is the very first black African woman to win a Nobel Prize.  She was the first woman in central Africa to receive a PhD – doctorate.  She was known as a Visionary – and connected the people’s lives with their environments.  She helped found the “Green Belt Movement”  She blazed a trail for democracy and human rights. 

2006 Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

Ellen becomes President of Liberia, the first female elected head of state in Africa.  She was elected and spent an immense amount of time out visiting her people.  She was the first democratically elected position.  She took lead when the country had been torn by war – no electricity, no water, many schools shut.  She helps lead to more prosperity.

2014 Malala Yousafzai

Malala became the youngest person ever to be awarded a Nobel Peace Prize.  She was shot in the face at 16 years old,  She was fighting the Taliban because they were stopping them from going to school.  She was on a mission for children’s rights to attend school.  She was in an extended comma.  She had a long recovery, relearning to walk.

Vintage Postcards about Women Calculator -W Pricing

Postcards about WomenVideo$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Cards
Woman's SuffrageVideo$ 595.00 / .99108Woman's Suffrage Postcards
1905 Bertha von Suttner Video$ 5.60 / .994Bertha von Suttner Postcards
1911 First International Women’s Day Video$ 172.49 / .6930First International Women’s Day Postcards
1932 Alexandra Kollontai Video$ 19.99 / 9.991 Alexandra Kollontai Postcards
1945 Eleanor Roosevelt Video$ 77.00 / .9921Eleanor Roosevelt Postcards
1958 Agda Rössel
Video00 Agda Rössel Postcards
1971 Helga Pederson.Video00Helga Pederson. Postcards
1973 Tennis star Billie Jean KingVideo$ 8.99 / .508 Billie Jean King Postcards
1974 Isabel Martínez de PerónVideo# 3.402 Isabel Martínez de Perón Postcards
Margaret ThatcherVideo$ 1.21 / .655Margaret Thatcher Postcards
1986 Maria Corazon Aquino
Video01 Maria Corazon Aquino Postcards
1997 Jenny Shipley
Video01Jenny Shipley Postcards
2004 Wangari Maathai, Video00Wangari Maathai, Postcards
2006 Ellen Johnson Sirleaf
Video05Ellen Johnson Sirleaf Postcards
.
2014 Malala Yousafzai
Video02 Malala Yousafzai Postcards
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Old Vintage Berlin Postcards Locator Helpful Illustrated Guide

Berlin Postcards

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Postcard History Berlin

Berlin is the capital city of Germany and is the largest city in Germany also.

Much of the land of Berlin was from ancient times from the Ruler Albert the Bear.      It is founded on the banks of the Spree river.

1539 – Berlin officially becomes Lutheran.

In 1576 the Black Plague killed about 6000 people when it struck the town of Berlin

30 years of war resulted in Half of the population being killed which at that time was around 12,000 people.  A new King Hodar was put in charge and he had politics of religious freedom and tolerance and the city began to grow to a population of around 20,000,  it had one-third of its buildings being demolished during that previous 30 years.    He also developed an army.    In 1933 the Capital was set on fire.

Unfortunately in World War II,   Berlin was a primary target of the allies trying to destroy it being the capital of Germany.

At the end of the WWII Germany was divided into 4 sections each being controlled by allied countries

  • American – South

  • British – North

  • French – West

  • Soviet – East

Cold war

After the war, Germany had been divided into four sections of the territory,  with English, American, Austrians and the Russian all holding parts in different territories.   Germany this also took place in Berlin and the Soviets the Russian wanted to drive out English so there was hostility this eventually resulted in the origination of East and western with the Berlin Wall going up there to separate the two.  When the division between the 2 countries took place in East and West Germany many of the residents fleeing to go to the free part of generating Germany from East Germany was losing all these skills and technology they were fleeing to the free country.   what Soviet Russia decided to do was to build the Berlin Wall so that they couldn’t they would not lose all the people that were moving to the free side.  1961 to keep all their own citizens there.

It did stop the flight headed toward freedom but was viewed as a communist rule.

Berlin Currency Reform

The allies have proposed currency relief in the city of Berlin.   it would clean up all the black market laundering of money that was taking place by making it worthless.    The Russians were not told. As this was Happening

Berlin Airlift

Or in June of 1948 Soviets had blockaded all the portions of Berlin except the ones they had access they were trying to shut off the western power from the city of Berlin.  The land was located right in the Soviet portion of Germany that had been divided to them and with a blockade that they set up.  it stopped all,  food and first aid supplies being taken to the population that was so desperately needed after the war eas halted..  When the Blockade started took place the city only had 36 days of food in supplies in at had only 45 days of coal for heat.  With the blockade taking place the western allies were greatly outnumbered in so the only choice they had was to retreat or surrender there to the Soviet Union.

  They could stay in Berlin where they were trapped or they could resort to surrender.  The Allies could send in military arms, to free them in Berlin but then that would have started another war, and the last one had just ended.  The Russians had been twice in the last 30 years,  that Germany had attacked Russia and they were very angry at the atrocities that Germany had brought upon them in so they just wanted Germans destruction.  They also wanted it to be a buffer zone to keep the western powers separated from Russia.

 

They advised President Truman that we should withdraw from Berlin,   but he said we are not leaving we are staying the Allies felt democracy was the best answer for Germany,  having its rebirth as a Democratic society, Russians did not agree.  The economy of berlin was destroyed after World War II.  Most of Berlin was starving the main reason was that at the end of the war German currency had become so inflated that they could not buy any foods that they needed to survive.  The Main Comoddity they use for money during that time was American cigarettes that’s how the country was surviving.

 

The Allies tried to fix the program through the monetary reform a currency change – but to counter that the Russians printed millions of notes and dump them on the market.  The Allies continued with the money monetization and created the duchemark for the Germans to use but when the Russians found out about it they completely surrounded Berlin with military force.

 

Now Berlin was starving,  the way the British and the Americans decided to look at it is they wanted to airlift by plane supplies into Berlin to keep it an alive.   So what they concluded was they would drop the supplies in my air and that if the Russians would shoot down any of their planes it would be an act of war.  Russians threaten to shoot down the planes,  but at the end did not do it because of the threat of military action.   for president Truman had called Stalin’s Bluff and the airlift supplies were being dropped in.

 

1949 – Federal Republic of Germany is Founded ( West Germany)  – the German Democratic Republic is Founded the same year

1961 Bradenburg Gate is closed

Brandenburg Gate– it originally opened as a symbol of peace and cooperation,  in Germany in 1791 – originally it was a symbol of peace and commerce – but under the nazi rule a sign of intolerance.  It was originally designed after the Acropolis in Athens Greece.  It has 12 Columns, and it has a Chariot on Top being pulled by 4 Horses.  It was originally named the Peace gate.

It was damaged mostly from Street Fighting in WWII

 

The gate just found itself inside the berlin Wall. On East Germany side.  Both Kenedy and Regan used the symbol of the Gate for backdrops to their speeches.  In 1970 Regan asked Gorbachev to tear down this wall.

Opened Again In 1989 the first time – since the wall was constructed that a German citizen Passed from one side of Germany to the other.  Now the gate is just a pedestrian walkway only.  It is surrounded by a hotel in the French embassy across from it.  In today we can walk right through it even though it one time it was the most closely guarded border.

 

President Ronald Regan visits Berlin – 1970

1961 people were fleeing East Germany, the Russian government trying to get into West Germany,  trying to get into freedom.  By the time the Berlin Wall taken down over 200 people had been executed as they try to escape from East Germany.

President Reagan gave a direct challenge to Gorbachev about tearing down the wall,  when he gave that message in front of the Brandenburg gate declaring the freedom that should be yours and said that no one ever went from freedom and tried to cross to the Soviet side,  He stated that,  every man was a German, and that he was separated from his fellow Germans by this wall.  We welcome change and openness, but we believe security and freedom Go together.  The advance of human liberty can only strengthen World Peace.  – He said Mr Gorbachauv – Open this Gate (Bradenburg Gate)

Vintage Old Berlin Germany Postcards

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Old Vintage Germany Postcards Locator – Helpful Illustrated Guide

Postcards from germany

We have been Developing a Research tool. to help you Locate and Research German Postcards for Postcard Collectors

  • German City with Research Link

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  • Link to Ebay’s Specific Search – 4 Million Available Postcards

Postcard History Germany

1880 – First Boer War

These wars took place at the bottom of the African continent in South Africa.   the title of the people was called the Boers and they were originally brought there from England and they established the country.   then diamonds were discovered in their land and that great discovery brought floods of people during that time.   for years battles going on between Boer control and England, they would rise up and England would come back and suppress them many times using scorched earth policies.   Germany had settled the country to the North and as the battles raged people came back and forth across the border it wasn’t shortly after that that they discovered gold in the board country in so many people were going after that mineral also.

1899 there was also the second Boer war when again rebellion took place and they were afraid of the Zulu African tribe and so war took place in Britain came in and quickly crush them again

1884 – Berlin Conference – Scramble for Africa

In the 1800s  many countries were flooding into Africa trying to plant their flags 0f their countries to claim territory.  Because Industrialization was going across the world at that time.   many countries were vying for the natural resources on the African continent the gold in the diamonds in the minerals, palm oil, cotton,  that was there.

Fighting over land and trade, the Suez canal began to disrupt trade.  The called the Berlin Conference.

18 countries met in Berlin.  Belgium, France, Portugal, England, and Germany were the major Players.

England had the most territory and they were fighting to maintain control..stating they were opposed to slavery – but in reality, slavery increased especially of women and children.  The European powers were trying to keep the natives divided.  So they could continue to exploit them.

German control of Rwanda,

The Europeans were maintaining control to be able to exploit the raw wealth of the African nation to fuel industrialization, and at the same time sell items back to the African continent – circular pattern.

This scramble led to the European Nations drawing arbitrary territory lines – regardless of what local populations had.

King Leopards II Congo war over 5 million was murdered and thousands had their hands chopped off.

1889 – Adolf Hitler was Born

Born in Austria – his father died when he was very young and growing up he was not a very good student.  His real name was Stackelberg any was actually a corporal in World War One.  End of World war one, Germany was suffering very hard because of all the sanctions in been placed on the country after the war. Adolf Hitler’s was able to rally the people in their suffering and in their despair.  You also at this time he started joining the political parties and rallying people against Jews.  This party later became the Nazi party.  Adolf Hitler led a  rebellion against the Republic of Germany but he failed after that they are they put him in prison and that’s where he stayed.

He used Anti-semitism as a tool for his rise to power.  In 1933 Adolf Hitler becomes chancellor of Germany,  now he has all the police and the military.   He forged his way into a dictatorship of the country of Germany.  He then invaded Poland.  Britain and France declared war on Germany and then shortly after that Hitler invaded the Soviet Union.  Who started the largest land war in history.  In December of 1941, he also declared war upon the United States.

50 Million People died.  He felt compelled to rid the world of the Jewish People.

Open June 6, 1944, the allies’ invasion to Normandy was a turning point of the war.  Less than one year Germany would surrender to the allies.

1892 – Rudolf Diesel – Invented the first Diesel Engine

Franco-German Engineer – he started by designing refrigerator within by 1892 he patented ignition engine, Known as the diesel engine.  It was a very simple engine design it was created to run all the simplest of fuel vegetable oil and coal dust.  It will compress the mixture so much that it would ignite just by the heat of the compression it was a very economical system to run.  He displayed and demonstrated,  one of his engines at the 1900 world fair and that one ran on peanut oil.  Became very economical at the time in farmers used it constantly farmers could even grow their own fuel.

Diesels’ new engine made him a millionaire by his forties.  1n 1913 traveling on a steamship from Belgium to England he drowned at sea.

1914 – WWI

1914 was the year that  Germany was involved in World War one and continued on for 4 years.  At the close of World War one many countries of the world were sick of fighting if they simply wanted the fighting to come to an in it there be peace and that’s when the beginning of the League of Nations took place.

1926 – Germany Joins League of Nations

63 nations all over the world joined together to promote peace.  Their idea was to settle conflicts and disagreements through conversation in discussions rather than war.  The League also wanted to increase and improve living conditions all over the clearly down on human trafficking slavery on prisoners of war a lot of the travesties that were taking place around the world.  Nations keeping tabs on one another – so that people had a better quality of life.

1936 – Summer Olympics in Berlin

Berlin hosted the 1936 Olympics in Berlin Germany.  Adolf Hitler wanted at the  Olympics that year in a way that he could show off the power in the might of the German country.   it was only slightly 3 years after that that they invaded Poland.  There was some boycotting of that year’s Olympics, but 43 countries sent athletes to Berlin to compete in that year’s games.  They Banned all Jewish athletes.  The first time in history – they were broadcasted live on television.  This is where Jesse Owens from Ohio State University – won over the germans.

1949 – West Germany Founded

Britan – the United States – France – Belgium – force the founding of the New Country of West Germany.  At The Old India Office.  Then 11 german political leaders gather and formed a group of 63 families to form the New West German Constitution.  They have a free election in a Democrat Christian politician is elected as president.  Otto Schumacher – Helmond the new capital was established in by and the new president, of course, wanted to raise a Catholic-dominated country as they renewed people simply wanted to come out of the poverty and desperation from WWII.

1961 –  Construction of Berlin wall

The Berlin Wall was constructed in 1961 in was not torn down till 1989 in it is the beginning of the Cold War.  Communist Party of East Germany were the ones who began building and constructing the world it was made solid and it had Barbwire on the top of it to prevent people from going back in it was a separation from the  Democratic style of West Germany to the dictatorship style of East Germany.  After the end of the World War was divided into sections and England and Britain had one section in Russia had the other section.  Berlin was divided between them all. Russians were determined to remove the Americans and the British people from the city of Berlin in the wall with keep people from going back and forth and they were able to separate the country even the German people could not go back and forth across the wall.

1972 Summer Olympics

The  72 Olympics was held in Munich Germany athletes from all over the world went there to celebrate sports and healthy competition. The competition at the Olympics was world wide in it was famous as the Russians and the Americans competed for Mark Spitz, and the little sparrow from Russia competed it was a famous Olympics,   but it is mostly remembered terrorist attack where at 11 Jewish Athletes were killed by Palestine.  This was the beginning of worldwide terrorism, on the world stage. Earlier Olympics when Adolf Hitler was alive he used it to propagate the superiority of the Aryan race but in contrast to that this Olympics was called by the German Olympic of peace.

2000 – Expo 2000 Hanover

First Expo happened in Hanover Germany  It was Initiated by the United Kingdom in 2000.  Over 180 countries attended the exposition.  The theme was humankind’s blending of Nature and Technology.  The German host wanted to show the need of good resource management across the earth and the need for people to manage it.  Emphasizing how technology help manage and regulate your’s resource one example was the water bus from Germany.

2005 – Angela Merkle becomes Chancellor

 

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Old Vintage Florida Postcards Locator w Pricing

Highway Map of Florida

History of the State of Florida

The records of Florida may be traced to when the primary local people started out to inhabit the peninsula as early as 14,000 years in the past. They left at the back of artifacts and archeological evidence. Florida’s written records begin with the arrival of Europeans; the Spanish explorer Juan ponce de león in 1513 made the primary textual facts. The state acquired its name from this Spanish conquistador, who called the peninsula la Pascua Florida in reputation of the verdant panorama and because it becomes the Easter season, which the Spaniards called Pascua Florida (competition of flowers).

This vicinity changed into the first mainland realm of America to be settled by means of Europeans. As a result, 1513 marked the start of the yank frontier. From that point of touch, Florida has had many waves of colonization and immigration, together with French and Spanish agreement throughout the sixteenth century, as well as entry of recent native American agencies migrating from somewhere else in the south, and free blacks and fugitive slaves, who inside the nineteenth century have become allied with the local Americans as black Seminoles. Florida becomes beneath colonial rule with the aid of Spain, France, and exceptional Britain at some stage in the 18th and nineteenth centuries earlier than becoming a territory of the United States in 1821.

Two a long time later, in 1845, Florida was admitted to the union as the twenty-seventh nation. For the reason that the 19th century, immigrants have arrived from Europe, Latin the USA, Africa, and Asia. Florida is nicknamed the “sunshine state” due to its heat climate and days of light, that have attracted northern migrants and travelers since the nineteen twenties. Numerous population and urbanized financial systems have evolved. In 2011 Florida, with over 19 million people, passed by and have become the 1/3 largest kingdom in the populace. The financial system has evolved through the years, starting with natural aid exploitation in logging, mining, fishing, and sponge diving; in addition to farm animals ranching, farming, and citrus growing. The tourism, real property, trade, banking, and retirement vacation spot corporations followed.

Florida Vintage Postcards

Since Ponce de Leon first set foot in the wilderness of Florida in the 1500s, people have been drawn to the “Sunshine State”. The Spanish established St. Augustine in 1565 and wipe out their French competitors, then the British gain control in the 1760’s only to lose the territory again to the Spanish. Finally, in 1821 the United States purchases Florida from Spain and in 1845 the territory becomes a state! When Henry Plant and Henry Flagler built their railroads down each coast, Florida begins a gilded age of travel and tourism which continues to this day. Early Florida postcards offer wonderful views of an unspoiled state. From the 1900s to the 1960s there were lots of vintage postcards created to show the beauty of every place and culture of Florida.

FLORIDA’S FIRST PEOPLES, 12,000 BC – 1500 AD

The first people move into Florida. Referred to today as Paleo-Indians, they moved into the peninsula in search of new food sources. These sources included mastodons, giant armadillos and horses. At that time, the end of the last ice Age, Florida was twice the size it is today.

Florida the Sunshine State

Florida, which joined the union as the 27th state in 1845, is nicknamed the Sunshine State and known for its balmy climate and natural beauty. Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon, who led the first European expedition to Florida in 1513, named the state in tribute to Spain’s Easter celebration known as “Pascua Florida,” or Feast of Flowers. During the first half of the 1800s, U.S. troops waged war with the region’s Native American population. During the Civil War, Florida was the third state to secede from the Union. Beginning in the late 19th century, residents of Northern states flocked to Florida to escape harsh winters. In the 20th century, tourism became Florida’s leading industry and remains so today, attracting millions of visitors annually. Florida is also known for its oranges and grapefruit, and some 80 percent of America’s citrus is grown there.

Capital: Tallahassee

Population: 18,801,310 (2010)

Size: 65,758 square miles

Nickname(s): Sunshine State

Motto: In God We Trust

Tree: Sabal Palm

Flower: Orange Blossom

Bird: Mockingbird

Some Interesting Facts

  • Spanish explorer Pedro Menéndez de Avilés established the first permanent European settlement in the United States at St. Augustine in 1565.

  • Before he was president of the United States, General Andrew Jackson led an invasion of Seminole Indians in Spanish-controlled Florida in 1817. After Florida became a U.S. Territory in 1821, Secretary of State John Quincy Adams appointed Jackson its military governor.

  • Constructed over a 21-year period from 1845 to 1866, Fort Zachary Taylor in Key West was controlled by Federal forces during the Civil War and used to deter supply ships from provisioning Confederate ports in the Gulf of Mexico. The fort was also used during the Spanish-American War.

  • In 1944, airman and pharmacist Benjamin Green from Miami developed the first widely used sunscreen to protect himself and other soldiers during World War II. He later founded the Coppertone Corporation.

  • John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth when he blasted off from Florida’s Cape Canaveral on February 20, 1962. Seven years later, Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon after Apollo 11 was launched from the nearby Kennedy Space Center on July 16, 1969.

Early history Geologic

The foundation of Florida was located in the continent of Gondwana at the South Pole 650 million years ago (Mya). When Gondwana collided with the continent of Laurentia 300 Mya, it had moved further north. 200 Mya, the merged continents containing what would be Florida, had moved north of the equator. By then, Florida was surrounded by desert, in the middle of a new continent, Pangaea. When Pangaea broke up 115 mya, Florida assumed shape as a peninsula. The emergent landmass of Florida was Orange Island, a low-relief island sitting atop the carbonate Florida Platform which emerged about 34 to 28 million years ago. When glaciation locked up the world’s water, starting 2.58 million years ago, the sea level dropped precipitously. It was approximately 100 meters (330 ft) lower than present levels. As a result, the Florida peninsula not only emerged but had a land area about twice what it is today. Florida also had a drier and cooler climate than in more recent times. There were a few flowing rivers or wetlands.

Indigenous peoples of Florida and Indigenous people of the Everglades region

Paleo-Indians entered what is now Florida at least 14,000 years ago, during the last glacial period. With lower sea levels, the Florida peninsula was much wider, and the climate was cooler and much dryer than in the present day. Freshwater was available only in sinkholes and limestone catchment basins, and paleo-Indian activity centered around these relatively scarce watering holes. Sinkholes and basins in the beds of modern rivers (such as the Page-Ladson site in the Aucilla River) have yielded a rich trove of paleo-Indian artifacts, including Clovis points.

 

Excavations at an ancient stone quarry (the Container Corporation of America site in Marion County) yielded “crude stone implements” showing signs of extensive wear from deposits below those holding Paleo-Indian artifacts. Thermoluminescence dating and weathering analysis independently gave dates of 26,000 to 28,000 years ago for the creation of the artifacts. The findings are controversial, and funding has not been available for follow-up studies.

 

As the glaciers began retreating about 8000 BC, the climate of Florida became warmer and wetter. As the glaciers melted, the sea level rose, reducing the landmass. Many prehistoric habitation sites along the old coastline were slowly submerged, making artifacts from early coastal cultures difficult to find. The paleo-Indian culture was replaced by or evolved into, the Early Archaic culture. With an increase in population and more water available, the people occupied many more locations, as evidenced by numerous artifacts. Archaeologists have learned much about the Early Archaic people of Florida from the discoveries made at Windover Pond. The Early Archaic period evolved into the Middle Archaic period around 5000 BC. People started living in villages near wetlands and along the coast at favored sites that were likely occupied for multiple generations.

 

The Late Archaic period started about 3000 BC when Florida’s climate had reached current conditions and the sea had risen close to its present level. People commonly occupied both fresh and saltwater wetlands. Large shell middens accumulated during this period. Many people lived in large villages with purpose-built earthwork mounds, such as at Horr’s Island, which had the largest permanently occupied community in the Archaic period in the southeastern United States. It also has the oldest burial mound in the East, dating to about 1450 BC. People began making fired pottery in Florida by 2000 BC. By about 500 BC, the Archaic culture, which had been fairly uniform across Florida, began to fragment into regional cultures.

British rule (1763–1783) and The expanded West Florida territory in 1767

In 1763, Spain traded Florida to the Kingdom of Great Britain for control of Havana, Cuba, which had been captured by the British during the Seven Years’ War. It was part of a large expansion of British territory following the country’s victory in the Seven Years’ War. Almost the entire Spanish population left, taking along most of the remaining indigenous population to Cuba. The British divided the territory into East Florida and West Florida. The British soon constructed the King’s Road connecting St. Augustine to Georgia.

The road crossed the St. Johns River at a narrow point, which the Seminole called Wacca Palatka and the British named “Cow Ford”, both names ostensibly reflecting the fact that cattle were brought across the river there. The British government gave land grants to officers and soldiers who had fought in the French and Indian War in order to encourage settlement. In order to induce settlers to move to the two new colonies reports of the natural wealth of Florida were published in England. A large number of British colonists who were “energetic and of good character” moved to Florida, mostly coming from South Carolina, Georgia, and England though there was also a group of settlers who came from the colony of Bermuda. This would be the first permanent English-speaking population in what is now Duval County, Baker County, St. Johns County and Nassau County.

The British built good public roads and introduced the cultivation of sugar cane, indigo and fruits as well the export of lumber. As a result of these initiatives, northeastern Florida prospered economically in a way it never did under Spanish rule. Furthermore, the British governors were directed to call general assemblies as soon as possible in order to make laws for the Floridas and in the meantime they were, with the advice of councils, to establish courts. This would be the first introduction of much of the English-derived legal system which Florida still has today including trial-by-jury, habeas corpus, and county-based government.

Florida in the Revolutionary War

When representatives from thirteen American colonies declared independence from Great Britain in 1776, many Floridians condemned the action. East and West Florida were backwater outposts whose populations included a large percentage of British military personnel and their families. There was little trade in or out of the colonies, so they were largely unaffected by the Stamp Act Crisis of 1765 and later policies which pushed other British colonies together in common interest against a shared threat. Thus, a majority of Florida residents were Loyalists, and the colonies of East and West Florida declined to send representatives to any of the sessions of the Continental Congress.

Second Spanish rule (1783–1821)

Spain’s reoccupation of Florida involved the arrival of some officials and soldiers at St. Augustine and Pensacola but very few new settlers. Most British residents had departed, leaving much of the territory depopulated and unguarded. North Florida continued to be the home of the newly amalgamated Seminole culture and a haven for people escaping slavery in the southern United States. Settlers in southern Georgia demanded that Spain control the Seminole population and capture runaway slaves, to which Spain replied that the slave owners were welcome to recapture the runaways themselves.

Republic of West Florida

American settlers established a permanent foothold in the western end of Florida’s panhandle, ignoring Spanish officials. The British settlers who had remained also resented Spanish rule, leading to a rebellion in 1810 and the establishment for ninety days of the so-called Free and Independent Republic of West Florida on September 23. After meetings beginning in June, rebels overcame the Spanish garrison at Baton Rouge (now in Louisiana) and unfurled the flag of the new republic: a single white star on a blue field. This flag would later become known as the “Bonnie Blue Flag”.

Republic of East Florida

In March 1812, Americans took control of Amelia Island on the Atlantic coast declared that they were a republic free from Spanish rule. The revolt was organized by General George Matthews of the U.S. Army, who had been authorized to secretly negotiate with the Spanish governor for American acquisition of East Florida. Instead, Matthews organized a group of a frontiersman in Georgia who arrived at the Spanish town of Fernandina and demanded the surrender of all of Amelia Island. Upon declaring the island a republic, he led his volunteers along with a contingent of regular army troops south towards St. Augustine.

American Frontier and the Florida Territory (1822–1845)

Florida became an organized territory of the United States on March 30, 1822. The Americans merged East Florida and West Florida (although the majority of West Florida was annexed to Territory of Orleans and Mississippi Territory), and established a new capital in Tallahassee, conveniently located halfway between the East Florida capital of St. Augustine and the West Florida capital of Pensacola. The boundaries of Florida’s first two counties, Escambia and St. Johns, approximately coincided with the boundaries of West and East Florida respectively.

Florida’s population mix has changed. After World War II, Florida was transformed as the development of air conditioning and the Interstate highway system encouraged migration by residents of the North and Midwest.

 

In 1950, Florida was ranked twentieth among the states in population; 50 years later it was ranked fourth[84], and 14 years later was number three[85][86]. Due to low tax rates and warm climate, Florida became the destination for many retirees from the Northeast, Midwest, and Canada.[87]

Florida became the battleground of the controversial 2000 US presidential election which took place on November 7, 2000. The count of the popular votes was extremely close, triggering automatic recounts. These recounts triggered accusations of fraud and manipulation and brought to light voting irregularities in the state.

Some Interesting Facts You May Not Know About Florida

You probably know Florida is home to Disney World and is nicknamed the Sunshine State. You may even know that Key West is the southernmost point in the continental U.S. and that St. Augustine is considered the oldest city in the country. If you are interested in moving to Florida consider enrolling in traffic school so you better understand the rules of the road. You can also check out some Virginia facts if you are planning a road trip. Now take a look at these 11 things you may not know about Florida.

  • Tolls

  • Florida has more toll roads and bridges than any other state in the Union.

  • Fern Capital

  • The small town of Pierson in Northeast Florida is known as the Fern Capital of the World. Ferns from farms here are shipped worldwide and these farms can be seen everywhere in the area.

  • Highest Point

  • The highest point in Florida is only 345 feet above sea level. Britton Hill is in the Florida Panhandle. The highest point in Florida’s peninsula is Sugarloaf Mountain near Clermont at 312 feet.

  • Golf

  • Florida has more golf courses than any other state and is home to the World Golf Hall of Fame and Museum in St. Augustine.

  • Gators and Crocs

  • The Florida Everglades is the only place on the planet where crocodiles and alligators live together.

  • Go with the Flow

  • Florida’s largest river, the St. Johns River, is one of only a few major rivers that flow from south to north.

  • More than Oranges

  • Florida is the largest producer of watermelons in the country. It also produces the most tomatoes, strawberries, and sugar.

  • That’s a LOT of Wood

  • Made mostly of Florida pine, The Belleview Biltmore Resort and Spa, northwest of Tampa Bay is said to be the world’s largest occupied wooden structure at 820,000 square feet.

  • Biggest City

  • You may be surprised to learn that in terms of area, Jacksonville, Florida is the largest city in the United States.

  • Long Lines

  • Sure there are long lines at Disney World. After all annual attendance is about 17 million people. That’s over 45,000 people per day on AVERAGE. Busy days will see over 100,000.

  • Cool!

  • It would make sense that mechanical refrigeration was invented in Florida. In 1851 Dr. John Gorrie of the little town of Apalachicola created the invention.

Florida’s Land Then and Now

The land we now call Florida began to form by a combination of volcanic activity and the deposit of marine sediments. It formed along northwest Africa about 530 million years ago.

In the earliest times, Florida was part of Gondwanaland, the supercontinent that later divided into Africa and South America. There is evidence that Florida separated from Gondwanaland about 300 million years ago.

Florida eventually found itself wedged between Gondwanaland and North America when they combined to form the supercontinent Pangea. When Pangea began to break up, Florida remained behind with North America.

 

Florida slipped slowly beneath the waves to become part of North America’s continental shelf. The landmass that is now Florida remained shallowly submerged beneath the ocean. Coral, shellfish, and fish skeletons piled up. This created a layer of limestone hundreds (in some places thousands) of feet thick.

As the Appalachian Mountains eroded, sand and clay were deposited over Florida’s limestone layer. Much of the quartz sand covering the state today came from the rocks of that mountain chain.

Throughout most of its history, Florida has been underwater. Portions of the Florida peninsula have been above or below sea level at least four times. As glaciers of ice in the north expanded and melted, the Florida peninsula emerged and submerged.

 

When the sea level was lowest, the land area of Florida was much larger than it is now. The sea level was as much as 100 feet lower than at present. Florida’s west coastline was probably 100 miles further out. As the climate warmed, the glaciers melted. This raised the sea level and flooded the Florida peninsula. The sea level stood at least 100 to 150 feet above the present level. Florida probably consisted of islands.

The formation of the Florida Keys occurred when tiny coral created a 150-mile long chain of underwater coral reefs. As the landmass of southern Florida began its slow rise, the reefs also began to emerge.

 

The Florida peninsula is the emergent portion of the Florida Platform. This is a wide, relatively flat land formation. The Florida Platform lies between the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. Florida’s landscape varies widely. Many of Florida’s prominent features have resulted from karst, a landscape with a base layer of limestone. Because limestone is porous, freshwater gradually dissolves the rock and forms cracks and passages.

The limestone layer of the state is honeycombed with underground rivers. Where the rivers break through to the surface, springs and sinkholes are found. Lakes and wetlands are abundant.

Although Florida is relatively flat, there are different elevations. They range from 0 to 320 feet above sea level. The highest elevations in the state are in the central highlands, which run down the center of the state.

Florida is classified as a stable geological area. This means that although some areas may experience tremors, severe weather events (such as hurricanes and tornadoes) pose tremendously greater threats to Florida than do earthquakes.

Flood prone areas in Florida are in either low-lying coastal areas or near inland rivers and lakes. Severe flooding problems can result from the storm surge developed as hurricanes approach the shoreline. Florida’s shoreline is constantly changing. Sand is being moved around by wind and waves.

 

Evidence indicates a trend toward global warming. If the world’s temperature warms, this may mean that the sea level will rise along most of the world’s coastlines. Florida has an extended coastline and many major cities are near the coast. Any rise in sea level poses a threat.

In the 20th century, tourism became Florida’s leading industry and remains so today, attracting millions of visitors annually. Florida is also known for its oranges and grapefruit, and some 80 percent of America’s citrus is grown there.

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Postcards from London History Locator w/ Pricing

Night Scene Tower Bridge

Origin

London has amazing the amount of history that we can understand and look at and when we’re studying the city of London I wanted to go back and take a quick look at the history of the town itself that sprang up along the River Thames and it started out close to 2000 years ago as a marshland in today we see it as it has changed into the thriving city of London that we see today originally it was owned by the Brits and during the days of the Roman Empire, they place their eyes as a prize for them to have England.

 

Romans

the country of Britannia became a country with a reputation of fear across Europe.   It was inhabited by Fierce warrior tribes and they were ready at all cost to defend their land.   It was a place of superstition and a place of the unknown as to the rest of Europe since it was separated by water.   During that time the Roman empire was very strong in Europe in Rome,   then  England was seen as something to be captured by  Julius Caesar.

He visited England in 55 BC,   at first it was a fact-finding trip to find out,  what was there and whether they wanted to try to conquer Terrotory.   Then the next year in 56 BC the large  Roman soldier army,  approximately 20,000  to make war on the Brits at that time they tried to conquer it but the Brits fault them off and they had to turn into feet then again in 4380 the Romans returned with twice the amount of men 40, 000 sold at that time they even brought and they conquered.   Through Fierce battles and Pillage.

After they had conquered the land, they came about the task of trying to manage and keep control of the warfaring nation of barbarians that they had caught.   so they took their fleet of ships and they sold them up the Thames River,   and then they found a location that,  we would know today is London and they felt that was a good spot and they set up a community where they actually built the first London Bridge,   that was there made out of wood and it also had gate so they could open up and closed so the ships could go back and pass.

   At the time they built this village it brought with it,   the prosperity.  the bridge that was built was made of wood and it at the time thousands of trees felled to make the construction project.    London became as history would call it as Londonium.    At that time had a population at that time of approximately 10,000 people.

 

Crossrail

Crossrail has been of the largest project that London has ever seen.   The Crossrail project building an underground railroad railway underneath the city across the capital.   In this building process, they have uncovered thousands of years of archaeological history,   from the town of London.   from the time it was a Marsh up until they completely prosperous technological thriving city that it is today.   some of that history has been uncovered in the ruins beneath the city as they continue to discover more and more items as not only the project goes forward but as archaeologists follow them uncovering more and more of the history and ancient events that took place to bring London to the place that it is today.

Julius Ceasar – Londonium

When the Romans had conquered. They set up from this time the town that we would know called is Londonium,   it had a population of about 10000 people but they had brought in slaves and workers, soldiers from all over the world to build this community.    Also, you have the native people that also moved in to take advantage of the things that were taking place the prosperity and the economy that Rome brought gave Londinium a great advantage and it became a thriving Commerce center in the trade because of its location on the Thames River.

 

Warrior Queen Buddha

Rome kept trying to conquer in a conquered different land,   and they had at the time they were in Londinium,  they had attacked another King and ransacked their city.   they conquered them and killed the King,   and his wife she was called queen Buddha,  she came back in retaliation.   they had killed her husband and they had raped her daughters and she put together an army of her late husband.   they came back and attack the Roman Army,  she brought with her had 100,000 soldiers with her, and they attack Londinium and they defeated the Roman army in the city.  They then Burnt it completely to the ground,  completely destroyed everything that had been built

Londonium Rebuilt

After Queen BudDas revenge had taken place and she literally burned Londinium

into the ground,   it only took close to 2 years for it to begin to be reborn again.   Romans again pouring more money and people into it and rebuild it.   The Romans Structure Building that was made out of stone,   very solid structures.  The town of Londonium again grew back to a population of around 7,000.  Through archaeology has found great Roman houses that have been built they had elaborate heating systems built underneath floors of their houses.   great decks out overlooking the Thames River.

Very elaborate dwellings.  As time went on in the Roman Empire continue to grow by the year 208 there were approximately 30,000 living in Londinium,  people from all over Europe came and made this a melting pot of nationality.   Archaeologists have found many countries that were present.   Through the identifying of Skeletons, people came from all over Europe to live there during this time.  Much of this history is been found from the Conrail project that is taking place,  it had literally become a melting pot for the whole world.   What began as a military outpost was now a thriving prosperous city. Roman Wall

Because of the warring characteristics of the people surrounding Londonium, The Romans built London’s first city wall.  It was approximately 18 feet high it was 9 feet wide.   They capped it with red limestone made it have the appearance of glowing red from miles and miles around.   it actually gave the city it’s defined shape for a long time. Much of this stone was quarried from the locality called Kent,  not only was it a quarry but they mined it with people and with prisoners,  in Roman times prisoners may have received a death sentence to work until they died in the quarries in Kent.   They would have to ferry by boat all the stones that were used in the building of that it is been estimated it probably took 2000 ferry trips,  to be able to get the stones to the location where they were built cleared in 282 AD

 

Ghost Town – with fall of the Roman Empire

By the end of the fifth century, the Roman Empire had begun to shrink.  Many of the outlying Territories were withdrawn from.   Londonium am was one of those areas.   the Roman Empire started to go back so they left Londinium when the  Romans went back.  without protection, many of the population that lived in Londinium followed them back.  Londonium was completely deserted and became a ghost town with no one living there at all even though it had a prime location on the Thames River. it would not stay vacant for long.

 

Saxons – Londonwich

In the seventh century, approximately 670 AD the Saxon Raiders from the North begin sweeping through England,  and as they were conquering,  as they went through and they found the great location that the Romans had found along the Thames River. Even Though at this time it was vacant, it did not take them long to start to establish their own city in that prime location.   the new city was called Londonwich and they said it settled it had a population have about 7000 people.   Almost all the buildings were made out of wood not stone like the Romans had done, and again because of its location trade and Commerce blossom in Londonwich began growing and thriving is it all had always done before in the past.

Vikings  

Next came the Vikings from the North.   They invaded and what pursued was 100 years of blood and war – Londonium  was attacked in 850  AD  by the Vikings conquering and pillaging the country in 851 AD  350 Viking warships  sailed up the Thames River an attack Londonwich play conquered it and took up residence

King Alfred

He was an English King of Great renown English history,  is King Alfred.  He rose up in  886 AD   expelled the Vikings.  When King Alfred raised his army he expelled the Vikings, he then moved the city back inside the old city walls that the Romans had built for protection of the city now at that time add another name which is called London Burr.

In his battles against the Vikings, great battles took place and one of the greatest was the one over London’s bridge which at that battle the Vikings in their ships to the bridge they then hooked to it and they pulled all the columns down that was holding it up and they literally destroyed London Bridge it in that great battle.

Becomes Londonburr

Good morning because of the great location of London it does not take long when it has short moments of peace for it to begin to thrive with commerce and trade that’s what began under king Alfred, came to do it as the renamed LondonBurr, grew and prospered and great multitudes of people were drawn to it because of its prosperity

 

Normans

But as time went on Peace did not continue,  next came the Normans out of the North in 1066 they were led by Duke Williams the bastard King, he gathered a large army and invaded London,  he captured it through the war and then after he had conquered it then he began establishing a method to control and manage it.   it was during this time they begin building Castles all over England,  great castles that we see today were built by the Normans during that time.   he also built a great Castle for himself. Duke Williams brought in stone Mason from Normandy to do all the construction it took 20 years for him to build his own castle,  he died before it was completed. they were doing because they wanted to make it so impressive that the native people would understand the strength and power that they had to help maintain their control.

 

Dynasty of Norman Kings

The Normans ruled England for approximately 200 years with this stability it did not take long for the ancient city of London to begin growing again. by the time of 1250 AD, the population again had risen to 80,000 people and it became the capital of England once again.

13th Century

It was During this time that we saw the continued separation of the 2 cities –  Westminster and then London and that they both continued to grow, Westminster house the King or the monarchy and in the area of London house all the finances markets and Commerce that took place,  and they continue to grow during this time Westminster Abbey with the Kings authority,  and he wanted to make it the most magnificent church in the world it was King Henry the third that decided to build it cost 2 years of annual revenue for the kingdom.   to build this magnificent church King Henry had not only did it for his piety sake,   but he had a great thirst for power and wealth now it is known as one of the most magnificent structures of the world

 

A Disaster of the Black Plague

In 1348 a great disaster-hit London it was the black plague.   it was a deadly disease carried by rodents he killed tens of thousands of people of London,  in 18 months it killed half of the cities population.    There were Many buried in great mass graves in pits, discovered with the Crossrail Excavation. it continues taking place in London now they have run into many of the mass graves they were made during that time in the city of London.   The bubonic plague was so great that at that time it killed one-third of the world’s population.   now contrary to that,  after the black plague living conditions improve,  prosperity improved,  food conditions improved, those who survived to seem to be stronger and also because of the lesser population a lot of things being able to get improve,  so 30 years after the disaster of the great plague, the black plague,  there was a new age of prosperity hitting London they described it as their streets being paved with gold business was booming.

 

Dick Whiting

It was at this time that we see the surface of a man by the name of,  Dick or Richard Whittingly,  he was the younger son of a Knight, in he was trained as an apprentice in cloth selling.   He did it so well,  that was how he made most of his money is a great fortune in the selling of clothes. From that start, he created a money lending business.   which he loaned money to Kings and businesses and future king’s.   in the years to come, he did such a great job for the city of London that it expanded. it that they made him mayor for 4 terms in London, he continued to loan lenders money to the Kings.   Some of his loans were secured by the crown jewels.   he bailed out Kings,  he paid for great city projects in 1411 AD he completed a library,  he also completed clean drinking water for the people, built a hospital.  He also made one of the first public toilets.   It would seat 128 people on the Thames River and twice a day when the tide would come up it would wash away the poop from the great toilet.

 

William Wallace sentenced to Death

at this time that we hear of history talking about William Wallace.   He was put to death in Westminster.   as we watch him Braveheart movie.

Henry 8th

It was during these years that the 2 great cities were vying for power Westminster,  and also London They were joined by a street called fleet street and because of the great Commerce and power that was going between the 2 centers,  it became one of the greatest streets of the world.   Eventually, both those centers of power would become one it was during the reign of Henry the eighth that he greatly sought piety and also he sought great wealth during his reign,   His quest for money would change the history of London.   in 1529 he wanted to marry his mistress and the church disapproved so he took the power from the church and proclaimed himself head of the Church.

 

He Built had a great palace.    King Henry the eighth confiscated the pope he replaced the castle.  He decided to make it the greatest palace in the world.   The people that disagreed with him,  he simply had hanged or killed.   in any property he needed for its construction he simply would take in 1698 AD was part of the palace was gutted by fire but the time is one of the greatest palaces of the world, but not all.

Queen Elizabeth – Virgin Queen

The next great time of prosperity in London was during the time of Queen Elizabeth, she was called the Virgin queen.   near old England and power at that time in 1581 AD is known as the time, when the ship came back called the “Golden hind” Francis Drake had actually circled the globe for the first time in history.   this began the great expansion of the British Empire on historic proportions.  He brought back the immense wealth that he had captured.   today we would call him a pirate,  He Robbed places and he brought wealth from the Americans.   He also robbed Spanish warships plundered them, London then became a world Hub,   it became famous for its international immigrant magnet from all over the world.

London Fire

London Had reached around 350,000 in population, area of approximately 5 miles from East to West.   the London fire started in the backyard of the Baker shop on a hot summer night.   this Sunday night in September of 1666 starting in the early hours of the morning the fire blazed on for 5 days of flame,   almost all of London was affected by 13,000 houses were destroyed 87 churches 80% of the city was in Ashes the disaster had leftover 100, 000 Londoners homeless.   After the fire,  King Charles the second asked for ideas how they could rebuild London,  many suggestions game but the suggestions from a man by the name of Wren was the most popular he suggested that day rebuild like Rome or Paris

St Pauls Cathedral

All of his suggestions were rejected but the one suggestion,  he had how to rebuild Saint pauls he made 3 designs,  and every one of them was rejected,  one after another finally he made the fourth design.    the King and the popes accepted that one and it took approximately 35 years to build Saint pauls cathedral.  After the fire,  London had been just about completely destroyed,   but it didn’t take long to get back up and running again great location on the Thames River but as it rebuilt.  Two Groups took form,  the very rich and the very poor.

  During the rebuild many of the rich rebuilt magnificent Homes.  The poor people did not have the money so that they lived in slums sometimes as many as  120 people living in a single dwelling. by the mid-1700 mother had become so popular because of the River set it was the shopping center of the luxury items rum sugar spices good in the city the Thames  River had become so crammed with ships,   did it was said you could walk across the river without touching the water.   there were approximately 37,000 workers that were working around that area of docs in 1799.

The West India company came up with a plan to build a new dock system.   they built a new dock so the ships could go in, and be offloaded and then leave out another exit.   Before that everything had to be offloaded by small ships in taking to the shores of the now the process had been automated in London even thrived more

 

Queen Victoria  1838

In 1838 an 18-year-old Princess has crowned Queen Victoria.  That time in England was moving into the industrial age.   Factories sprang up, it was a  great time of prosperity.   but with that also came a great time of pollution –  industrial pollution –  fires –  smog the River being intensely full of sewage.

 

Railways – 1836

In 1836 another great change hit London that changed her face forever.   it was the time of the railway.  A period of intensive railroads was being built throughout London to increase the amount of traffic that could go in and out of the capital city.   at that time there were 19 different companies that were competing to build rail stations.   at that time tunnels became popular people could get to work in the center of the city.   it is said that every day 20,000 travelers would commute to London to work at that time the population in run London grew to be 3,000,000 at the same time of that great growth the people,  the pollution grew just as  fast the Thames River being completely polluted

Cholera

In 1850 there was a great outbreak of Cholera having sprung up all over the city,  500 cases of Cholera was named in just one community alone.   there was a doctor – John Snow –  at that time who believes the cholera was caused by the contamination of water.  At that time the thought was it was being caused by the great amounts of smog.   He created a map of Fatalities and you could see its progress from the contaminated water supply.  To run a test he proposed to the city officials that they removed the handle of the local well pump.   Immediately the Cholera outbreak stopped.

 

The Great Stink

The sewage and contamination was so great that the stink of the Thames was very bad at that time

The city officials determined to move forward with a plan to handle the increasing sewage.  The Plan they put into play was a building project of 1300 miles of sewer pipe to carry the city sewage to the mouth of the Thames, to be carried it out to sea.

 

Old Postcards United Kingdom / UK/ England History

DateEventsDescriptionNumber of PostcardsEbay Postcards Over 4 Million PostcardsLink
1863First Underground Train - London PostcardsFirst In London8Postcards
1912Stainless Steel PostcardsInvented
1914English WWI Postcards
Enters WWI
Enters war228Postcards
1939English WWII Postcards
Enters WWII
Enters war69Postcards
1979Margaret Thatcher PostcardsBecome Prime Ministers6Postcards
1985Bradford Fire PostcardsStadium Fire3Postcards
1996UEFA Euro 1996 PostcardsEngland Host30Postcards
1997Tony Blair Prime Minister Postcards35Postcards
1997Diana Dies PostcardsPrincess Diana of Wales696Postcards
2003England Wins Rugby Cup PostcardsDefeating Austrailia36Postcards
2005Bombing Londons Subways PostcardsPublic Transportation30Postcards
20122012 Summer Olympics PostcardsLondon28Postcards

 

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Alfred Pearse Postcards1855 - 1933England30Postcards
Photochrom Company Postcards1856 - 1924England839Postcards
Jarrold & Sons. Postcards1745-1775England42Postcards
Rotary Photographic Co1901London England1,580Postcards
William Rothenstein Postcards1872 - 1945English7Postcards
Charles Houton Howard Postcards1899-1978American42Postcards
J. Salmon Postcards1844 - 1923England1,818Postcards
Joseph Mallord William Turner Postcards1771 - 1851England1,372Postcards
W.N. Sharpe Ltd. Postcards1950 - 2011England839Postcards
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Christopher Clark, PostcardsPresent4,242Postcards
Philip Dadd Postcards1880 - 1916England11Postcards
Donald MacPherson Postcards1920 - 198630Postcards
Paul Thiriat Postcards1898 - 1970113Postcards
Harry Payne Postcards1858 - 1927England Military648Postcards
G.T. Clarkson Postcards166Postcards
Hans Bohrdt Postcards1857 - 1945German15Postcards
Bernard F. Gribble Postcards1872 - 1962England Marine39Postcards
R. Caton Woodville. Postcards1856 - 1927England150Postcards
John Valentine Postcards1730 - 1791Scotland125Postcards
Louis Wain Postcards1860 - 1939England295Postcards
Herbert Ward Postcards1883 - 1919England1,934Postcards
Louis Whirter Postcards1873 - 1932Scotland15Postcards
William Barnes Wollen Postcards1857 - 1936England563Postcards
Lawson Wood Postcards1878 - 1957England150Postcards
J.H. Roberts Postcards1884 - 1961England7159Postcards
Richard Caton Woodville, Jr
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1856 - 1927England150Postcards
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1887 - 1965English4Postcards
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What are Django Fontina Postcards

Django Fontina Postcard Wordpress.com

In contrary to what you may think, postcards are not just about greetings, invitations and all. In fact, while it seems like postcards were just the real deal in the past, especially when used as a means of communication, most tourist actually used their postcards to spread poetry to others. And those type of postcards is what came to be known as the Django Fontina Postcard. So today, we are going to look at what this type of postcard is, how it originated, and what it was later used for.

WHAT IS DJANGO FONTINA POSTCARD?

Simply stated, Django Fontina postcard is one that is written to a random stranger, containing poems in it. Depending on the size of the postcard, the sender can decide to write more than one poetry in the postcard.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF DJANGO FONTINA

The inked(typed) poems on most of the Django Fontina postcards were taken and reconstructed into text form, from old postcards. The sending of Django postcard was really in vogue during the 1970s, and were often sent from popular tourist destinations around Britain.  That’s why in the series “Wish you were here” each poem are paired by a continuous-line drawing of a map identifying the location described. In other words, the sender of these postcards where not necessarily poets, but were just creative enough to translate pictures on old postcards into something poetic.

PEOPLE WHO TOOK PART IN SENDING DJANGO FONTINA POSTCARDS

Most of the times, the participants were always invited to make a poetic contribution into published books or poetry collections. And when they were done, since they won’t be credited for the work on the published book, they would then write the same poems in a postcard and send them to random strangers, so that they would recognize that was their poem in which the editors used in the published books, or poetry collections. So, while some sent Django Fontina for just the fun it, others did it to gain popularity or acknowledgement for their poems.

EXAMPLES OF DJANGO FONTINA

Here are some examples of how the poems in Django Fontina Postcards often appeared.

  1. Dear You, or Belulino,

She, there, dangling mobile, is missing her better half.  And what is that thing eating the snowman’s nose? And why is his nose so low like it’s his…sick, he must be running a cold from all the heat heat hot. HO ho hmmm, he sure looks like he’s melting. By jingo! A dollop, a dollop, and bloody coo! A cudgel, to bludgeon. But walloping whom? The wolf, the wolf, took a bite of the moon. Look! His marmalade maw, his guilty, red paw. The rabbit, the rabbit, is hungry for carrots. The sun, the sky, they like a good drink. So they toast and they chug, until little is left but a top hat, some buttons, a crimson foulard. Then the homeless, they lute, for winter is hard. And what’s to be said of the weapon, but that the snowman needed protection? Still, he was eaten, he was drunk––he was all out of luck. The morn was here and the moon was there. Everything passes in this “living” affair.

Except when you buy electric snowmen from me, Django Fontina, the premier plug-in snowman dealer in all the land. So help stop the violence and shop here, where we keep the moon full all winter long.

Yours,

Django Fontina

  1. Dear you, or Belulino,

Momma said never to ask him all those questions about what who why ever.

Said shut your mouth, he don’t need yo lip.

But sometimes in hush hush, he put a blanket over heads,

And sneak me some true Poppa wisp hers,

Like jumps through double Dutch.

About how torture was when they plug up the fire hydrants and erase the hopscotch chalk Up from your pavement,

All that happening inside you,

And that’s where scar tissue on broken backs web from.

Teacher said we like this for the storm keep rattling at us,

Blows seeds to where they don’t belong,

Which means diversity,

Like how when Momma fight Poppa I catch words I never heard.

Adultery = grown speak.

But the storm is less than half the deck, Poppa wisp her’d.

The kings and queens ride the mess.

And all the fuss and holler just dust below the light.

That’s why I’ve gotta learn and write, to make for better seeing,

Like Byrds of Jazz fly on high.

Momma said raps are the poems of nightness,

So I should black up my verses to rhyming bars for stardom.

She said Poppa yells at her cause he wanted to be famous and but became just an old broke soldier,

That war made his blood boil always too hot in his neck veins,

But I think she just don’t know how to please a man.

His words always just nice warm to me.

I like to wisp her down my words for true secrets float above the dust,

Like ice cream over root beer.

And little girls need more than school to not become like Mommas,

Which is why I still ask Poppa questions in hush hush with the blanket over heads.

Yours,

Django Fontina

  1. Dear you,

The quiet and leisure I was now enjoying, I made use of further in arranging and working out many things which I had commenced in days of the wildest confusion.  I read over and revised my chromatic papers: drew various diagrams for my colour-tables, which I altered repeatedly, in order to make clearer what I wished to represent and maintain.

Yours,

Mendo Allen

THE FAMOUS SERIES OF DJANGO FONTINA POSTCARDS

There is a compilation, or what you could call a series of Django Fontina postcards known as “Wish you were here”. This is a series of Django Fontina postcards which as I stated earlier, are a form of postcard written and posted to strangers as a means of distributing poetry.

THE STRUCTURES AND FORM OF DJANGO FONTINA POSTCARD

The poems in each Django Fontina postcard was often inked in black, while maintaining a very tiny but witty font to fit in, most of the poetry. As noted by most historians, Django Fontina Postcards were devoid of actual pictures, rather, the poems were accompanied by things like symbols or what we could call today clip-arts.

So, what do you think? Were those tourists who practised the art of sending Django Fontina postcards adventurous? Or where they just ignorant?

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Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards
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What are Artist Signed Postcards

What are Artist Signed Postcards

Artists-signed postcards have been around for so long, especially when technology was never an idea. So today, we are going to be looking at what this form of the postcard is, how it started, and some of its prominent designers. And without any further ado, let’s get started!

WHAT ARE ARTIST SIGNED POSTCARDS AND HOW ARE THEY MADE?

Basically, Artist-signed postcards are simply reproductions of original works of art. To date, it is the most collectible (sort after) type of postcards in the world of art. However, just because they are called artist signed postcards does not mean that all of them were autographed by the artists themselves, no. Now, this is what used to happen. Back then, oftentimes, the original drawing or painting were signed with the real artist ‘s full name, monogram or initials, and when the artwork is being reproduced, they will just replicate the signature. Something like a photocopy of the original signature.

THE ARTIST SIGNED POSTCARD ERA

The artist signed the postcard’s dominant era was specifically between 1898 to 1918 when the world was not yet introduced to the wonders of technology where they could have had cell phones, radios, computers or TV. Thus, these postcards were an economical and easy means to keep in touch with one another. And that’s why most of the artist signed postcards were made to be pictured, printed, and mailed to acquaintances. Other sources of artist-signed postcards were newspapers and magazines, comic strips, illustrations, posters, kid’s books, and so on.

THE SIGNATURES

In regards to the signatures on these artworks, the artist was often left with two choices. Either to keep the signature after reproducing the work into postcards for commercial purposes, or blur/crop out the signature if the artist was a passionate type who wasn’t after commercializing the reproduced postcards. Interestingly, the unsigned postcards where the artists often decided to blur or crop out the original signature, if attractive, where often priced at a higher value than the just duplicated ones.

THE ROLE AND GROWTH OF WOMEN

During this era when artist signed postcards were trending, surprisingly, women were of high value in the art industry, which made most of them seriously consider the postcard reproduction professional as a career path. An example of such a women who stood up to the task was Rose O’Neill, maker of the Kewpie, who had the foresight of copyrighting her pictures. Turns out, she succeeded and was able to accumulate a great deal of fortune in her lifetime. Other than her, famous and highly talented artists like Ellen Clapsaddle, Grace Gebbie Drayton, and Frances Brundage took up the job of always drawing cute full(chubby-cheeked) kids for postcards, newspapers, magazines, kid’s books, advertisements agencies, and paper dolls.

INSTANCES OF ARTIST SIGNED POSTCARDS

Below are some of the instances were artists reproduced artworks into signed postcards.

  1. In 1910, Frances Brundage stopped working for Tuck, and as a result, took her illustrations to the Samuel Gabriel Company of New York. When she got to the company, Brundage altered Tuck’s original style, leaving her fellow Victorian girls out of business, just to please the new publisher who needed a more naturalistic appearance of kids running, playing, and horsing around. There and then, Brundage signed the postcard, which was originally Tuck’s with her full name, and thus becoming popular for it. Today, these Gabriel postcards are quite easy to find.

  1. When Grace Gebbie Drayton-Wiederseim was a little girl, she drew big-eyed round-faced self-portraits and then based her Campbell’s Kids advertising characters on it. And in 1904, she got a contract for a well-loved soup company, where she worked for 20 years, drawing all kinds of advertisements, producing book and magazine illustrations, and Dolly Dingle holiday cards/ paper dolls, while still maintaining the exact same style of adorable children. But during her first marriage (1900-1911), she had to sign her cards with the inscription G.G. Wiederseim, because that’s what the publishers wanted. All the publishers who published her postcards between 1907-1911 included, Reinthal & Newman, Campbell Art Co., Tuck, A.M. Davis, and Alfred Schweiser. Nevertheless, Drayton quickly remarried in 1911, and her postcards were republished, this time, only by Reinthal & Newman between 1911 and 1916 under her real name, G.G. Drayton. And as I stated earlier, the card became highly prized by collectors because the postcard contained the signature of an artist who was not only great at drawing, but alive at that moment.

  1. Rose O’Neill started out her career by vending illustrations to magazines such as “Truth,” “Collier’s,” “Harper’s Monthly,” and “Bazaar.” In 1896, she got married to one Gray Latham, and as a result, had to work for “Puck,” where she had the opportunity to produce over 700-plus drawings, signed “O’Neill Latham, instead of Rose. Toward the end of their five-year marriage, she reproduced similar postcards this time, dropping the “Latham” and replacing it with the place “Rose”. Currently, these postcards are now with the signature Rose O’Neill.

Other artist signed postcard makers, well known for their ability to convert old artworks into artist signed postcards included;

Mabel Lucie

Attwell

Kathe Kruse

Jessie Willcox Smith

Bessie Pease Gutmann

Katharine Gassaway

Jason Frexias

Charles R. Twelvetrees

Bernhardt Wall, Elisabeth Bem

Magnus Greiner

Ida Waugh

Rie Cramer

H.B. Griggs.

In a nutshell, artist signed postcards where very popular and lucrative between 1898 to 1914 to be precise. After World War 1 broke out in 1914, postcards generally, not only artist-signed ones were in the fall because, they were considered expensive, plus, technology had found its way by then through the invention of telephones and so on, thus making postcards more or less redundant. However, the important point is that during this era, when the artist-signed postcards where invoke, women were more dominant than their male counterparts. From the likes of Frances Brundage, Grace Drayton, Rose O’Neill and so on, the commercialization of artist-signed postcards really favored the female artists. So, if you’d love to see how these postcards looked like, you can check them out on Darlenesoldpostcards and let us know what you think of this high sort for work of art.

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards
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What are Composite Postcards

Example of Composite Postcards

Lately, we’ve been having some heart to heart discussions on the types of postcards, and how wonderful they are. And so today, still in that same spirit of “postcarding”, if that even makes any sense, we will be looking at another popular type of postcards.; the one most people commonly refer to as composites postcards. So as usual, we’ll get to analyze what this form of postcard is, its history, and its format, who needs it, how it is being used and so on. And without any further ado, let’s get on with it.

What is Composites Postcard?

 

Composite – This is a photograph with two separate images printed on the same photo paper.

Basically, a composite postcard is a marketing tool for actors, most especially models. They serve as the latest and most efficient of a model’s portfolio, which is often being used as a business postcard. In other words, a Composite postcard is what agencies use to submit a prospective model to clients for work. Sometimes today, they do it digitally, but it is a collection of pictures that they’re going to show to clients to say, hey, we think this is the girl/guy that you should hire for the job. So generally, a composite postcard generally is an eight and a half by five and a half size card, which is half the size of a sheet of paper.  It’s a thick cardstock and it is basically a model business card. On the front, you are going to have your headshot with your name underneath. On the back, you will have four photos you want to show some range of personality. And in those four pictures, you want to have different looks, different hairstyles and so on.

Then on the bottom of the composite postcard, you’ve got your measurements, your height, your bust, waist, hips, dress size, shoe size, eye color, and hair color. Then the little extra space at the bottom is so that agencies have room to add a sticker with their contact information. However, never put your email address or your phone number on your composite card, as agencies won’t be able to use it. Below is a complete rundown of its format.

Format  

A composites postcard typically contains a minimum of two pages – a cover page with a full-size portrait and a second page with a selection of representative shots from the portfolio. It lists the model’s basic stats – typically height, weight, three sizes (bust, waist, hips) for women, suit or chest size and waist and inseam sizes for men, plus shoe size, eye, and hair color, nationality, and contact information. It is printed on both sides of an 8.5″ x 5.5″ [4] piece of postcard stock (12 pt stock) (US) or A5 on postcard weight (350/400 g/m2 stock in metric countries) which is between 300 and 450 μm thick depending on the postcard stock or quality chosen (Europe, Asia).

History

Peter Marlowe in London invented models composites in 1965, then printed on paper to A4 format. The style was then changed in 1972 to the A5 postcard style, for filing purposes, and a few other companies started publishing postcards for the model industry under different trade names since Peter Marlowe had registered the trademark “Model Composite” in Europe and the USA.

Amongst these was Sebastian Sed who traded under the name Sed postcards, which are sometimes mispronounced as Z (“Zed”) or Set Postcards. The publishing house of Marlowe Press stopped trading in 1990 and the words “models composites” and “composites postcards” became generic within the model industry. Composites postcard databases and creation tools have moved online in recent years.

How Composites Postcards Are Used

Composites Postcards have been around for many years as an essential marketing tool for a model, and are likely to retain this standing because they are an inexpensive way to effectively and professionally showcase a model’s ability. Composite postcards are used on three major levels – they are used by models, agents and the agent’s client

How Composites Postcards are produced       

Currently, models have many different options of creating composites postcards. They can ask their photographer or create their own on their computers using image editing or graphics software. In addition, with technology’s increasingly strong influence in the digital market, many printing companies have looked to the internet to facilitate the ordering process. Composites postcard printing prices can vary depending on the number of pictures used on the postcard, the type of paper stock used, and the general printing quality. Different layout styles are available or can be created.

Who are Composites Postcards for?

Composite postcards are essential for business people. They’re an inexpensive and effective way to make a good first impression, to professionally showcase your abilities, and to share your contact information with agencies, scouts, clients, photographers, and other industry professionals. So, any model that is serious about their career, whether it’s commercial, fashion, plus-size, or any other type of modeling, needs to have composite postcards! Keep in mind that if you plan on doing multiple kinds of modeling (like commercial and parts modeling; for example), you’ll need to have a separate composites postcard for each type.

Should You Go for Online Composites postcard or a Printed Composites postcard?

These days, many models use a combination of digital and physical composite postcards. They’re basically the same, but with one obvious difference: One you email and the other you snail mail or hand out.

However, if you are just starting out then an online composite postcard is the way to go. The beauty of an online composite postcard is that you can quickly swap out photos yourself rather than having to reprint hundreds of postcards at the printing company. Online composites postcards are the most inexpensive choice for new models that are often changing their photos in the beginning. Once you become a little more established, then you can invest in printed postcards.

 

All composites postcards, whether they’re online or not, act like mini-portfolios and are a quick and easy way for agencies, scouts, and clients to see what you’re all about as a model, and shows them that you’re serious about a future in modeling. It’s good to have both kinds on hand just in case the recipient prefers one type over the other.

Appearance

The unique thing about these postcards is that, no two composites postcards are identical. Nevertheless, the industry-standard layout includes one large photo (your best one!) and four smaller photos, with your name, details, and contact information at the bottom. Online composites postcards are simply an eye-catching image that contains all of these elements, typically with the large photo on the left and the four smaller ones stacked on the right. Physical composites postcards are typically double-sided (one large photo on the front, smaller photos on the back) and printed on an 8.5″ x 5.5″ piece of glossy cardstock.

In a nutshell, composites postcards are the gateway to landing you the perfect job in the modeling industry. So, if you want to appear professional, take your time to ensure that your composites postcard comes out perfectly.

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards
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What are Art Nouveau Postcards

Example of Art Nouveau Postcard from Wikikart

Postcards are everywhere, and while some are adorable, the rest is just impeccable. But here is what we don’t know. Postcards are of different types. That’s why while one has a specific pattern of design, the other tends to vary. And so, after doing some digging into the different types of postcards, it came as a shock to me that they are a lot more forms than I could have ever imagined. And that’s why today, I will be sharing with you one of the many types of postcards; the Art Nouveau postcards precisely. But to have a better understanding of what this form of the postcard is all about, we are going to first have a look at how Art Nouveau came about, and how an Art Nouveau postcard looks like.

 

History of Art Nouveau

By the late 1800s, art and Europe had taken a decidedly academic turn to be considered. Then, a serious individual artist had to attend one of the many art academies. They needed to commit to a rigorous study of line, shape, form, and texture, with the ultimate goal of producing paintings of idealized figures and landscapes. And of course, for all the artists who did just that, some thought academic art was rubbish and reacted accordingly. They believed art isn’t meant to be studied like science or math. They thought art flows from the soul, twists through the consciousness and decorates life with its beauty.  These rebel artists driven to impart their own style in the art world were the innovators of the very short but highly influential movement known as Art Nouveau.

Lasting from approximately 1890 to 1910, Art Nouveau which means “new art” in French, moved away from imitation of real subjects, and move towards the flowing and twisting lines and shapes of nature. Art Nouveau pieces are organic in their ornamentation, featuring what many art historians call whiplash curves, decorating every available surface. Due to the opening of foreign relations with Japan, the flowing lines of Japanese woodblock prints became a new inspiration for European artists. The simplicity, muted colors enriched two-dimensional imagery, are prominent features of both Japanese prints and Art Nouveau design. Art Nouveau artists were also influenced by the Arts and Crafts movements’ emphasis on hand craftsmanship, and the highly expressive paintings of posts Impressionists. So, what are the characteristics of an Art Nouveau, and how can you know when you see one?

Characteristics of Art Nouveau

Common characteristics of Art Nouveau are muted colors like olive, green, carnation pink, and periwinkle blue writhing and swirling lines, as well as natural imagery, nature illustrations of deep-sea creatures and plants published by biologists, were used as artists reference books. So, let’s look at some examples of an Art Nouveau.

Examples

Firstly, examples of this new art could be found in all art forms during this time, sculpture and painting of course, but also architecture, jewelry, household items, and graphics. The view that sculpture and painting were superior crafts was passionately challenged. This movement brought about interior design as artists strove for harmony and continuity in decor.  These artists wanted to replace the mishmash of mass-produced items antiques and classical imitations with well-made original and coordinated decorations, and furniture.  But it didn’t just stop there, and that’s how the Art Nouveau postcards came into existence.

Art Nouveau Postcards

Art Nouveau was the first artistic movement to give serious credibility to the graphic arts especially the poster as an art form. The immensely popular posters designed by Henri Toulouse-Lautrec for example, contain illustrations and decorative lettering that practically foretells art’s later emphasis on graphic design. In addition to posters, are Novo’s graphics beautified book covers catalogs, and playbills. Louis Comfort Tiffany designs in glass, with her imagery taken directly from the natural world, are also prime examples of Art Nouveau. Tiffany’s stained glass lamps and windows are special because unlike typical stained glass which is created by painting on clear glass, Tiffany’s windows and lamps featured subtly dyed opalescent glass.

The ornamental nature of famed Austrian painter Gustav Klimt, whose work is another example of Art Nouveau at its most dominant his work is decorative, colorful, and contained gold leaf, like in the painting “The kiss and the portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer”, which leave no space unadorned.

The twisting organic lines of Art Nouveau can also be found in the paintings and illustrations of artist Alphonse Mukha, his elongated depictions of actresses and fantasy women, decorated advertisements theater posters, and more. One of Mukah’s best-known works is a set of decorative panels. The seasons which personifies the seasons as sensuous women that illustrate both a character of each season individually, as well as the harmony of seasons throughout the year.

Art Nouveau had a great run and even though it lasted only 20 years, the work produced during this period made a lasting impression on the art world. Towards the end of Art Nouveau, heyday, the prevailing aesthetic, eventually gave way to the more industrial lines of modernism and the more predictable geometric forms of Art Deco. Still, the influence and appreciation of Art Nouveau organic forms and prolific ornamentation has lasted till today, and there are a lot including its postcards. And speaking of postcards;

 

Art nouveau postcards today often range between $4 to $40 depending on the quality and artists. And if you’re looking to get more of such, you can simply do so by logging on to prominent postcards websites like darlenesoldpostcards to check out amazing Art Nouveau postcards of your choice.

 

So all in all, even though Art Nouveau has its history dating far back to the earliest centuries, nevertheless, it is still a much-appreciated art. And that’s clearly why you can find its paintings and postcards, almost everywhere like Italy, Spain Denmark, of course, France, and so on. Do well to check them out, and let us know how well you enjoyed your journey into the wonders of these amazing Art Nouveau postcards.

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards

 

I couldn’t find a Video on Art Nouvea Postcards – But I did find a video on this style of Artwork

 

Art Nouveau Art Style
Art Nouveau Art Style
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What are Court Postcards

Example Court Postcard from Wili

There are different types of elements in this world. And the most important reason why you need to understand how one thing differs from the other is so that you will have a better comprehension of how they operate. We’ve been hearing a lot about cards ever since we were like kids, but what most people like me, failed to understand was that there are other types of cards, other than the cardboard we all know. And I’m talking about types such as court cards. So, what is a court card? And how did it come into existence? Who first used it and why? These and many more we shall be addressing as we go further in this write-up.

 

Origin of Court Cards

Court card or what is sometimes known as court-sized card, was the name given to a postcard, with a size of a picture. Primarily, records have it that it was used in the United Kingdom, measuring approximately 4.75 x 3.5 inches, with a believed standard size of 5.5 x 3.5 inches. Basically, court cards were known to be smaller in size, with a square looking shape, a bit higher than later cards. And it is also believed to have been used from about 1894 to 1902.  In keeping with the regulations of the time, court cards had an un-divided back, which was meant for the address only,  and the message had to be written on the ‘front’ of the court card. But, even though court cards were primarily made use of in the UK, a lot of them were printed by Germany’s chromolithography. Today, a lot of clear examples of these type of cards still exist, and are in high demand from philatelists and postcard collectors.

 

An Overview of Court Cards

Though most of us are quite used to seeing court cards virtually everywhere these days, from souvenir shops to card stores, to museum gift shops, and even at the grocery store, court cards are a relatively recent invention. However as stated earlier, the oldest court card, and what is believed to be the first, was sent in 1840 in England. Generally, most court cards are instantly recognizable because of their square-like shape and thick card stock paper, which is often made for writing and mailing something without an envelope. Of course, there are novelty exceptions to the shape and material with court cards; however, the standard court card type remains the same. Plus, there is even a branch of study today which is focused on collecting and studying court cards, known as deltiology.

Ever since postal services began in various parts of the world, there have been the occasional people who write messages on cards and send them without envelopes. These early examples were always handmade and not of standard size and material construction. What is considered the first official court card as we know them today was a hand-painted design on a card that was created by writer Theodore Hook in London in 1840; he mailed the card to himself, using a black penny stamp. It is believed he created, and mailed the card as a joke to the post office, as the design he painted on it was a caricature of postal workers in a post office. This first court card is now in the hands of a private collector, having sold at auction in 2002 for £31,750, $ 41,275  todays Conversion Rate

The court card made its way to the United States in 1848, with the sending of a card depicting printed advertising. It was a handmade card, like its British predecessor, court cards began being commercially produced in the United States in 1861. The first producer of them was John P. Charlton in Philadelphia, who obtained a patent on his court card design. Charlton soon after sold the rights to his patent to Hyman Lipman. Lipman sold court cards with decorated borders, but no images, and labeled them “Lipman’s postal card.”

In issuing official court cards, England was not far behind the United States. The British post office began issuing court cards without images in 1870, and included a stamp in the design, so buying additional postage was not necessary; the price of the stamp was built into the cost of the court card. There were originally two sizes of cards offered, but the larger one was found to be too difficult to handle by postal workers and was soon discontinued. Thus, the smaller card came into use.

While people had been designing images of their own on-court cards for a while, the first court card sold with a commercially printed image on it was made in France in 1870, by Leon Besnardeau at Camp Conlin. This was a training camp for soldiers who were participating in the Franco-Prussian War. The design of the court card included a picture of piles of weapons on either side of a scroll. The scroll was topped by an image of the arms of the Duchy of Brittany.

In a nutshell, court card postcards can be today be portrayed as the emailing system we operate on now, with the only difference being the internet and interface ( yahoo, Gmail). Prior to the advent of high-class technology, where things such as the internet and smartphones got invented, the art of mailing one another was carried out through the use of court card postcards, which often carried the message and the date at the back of the card. So, if you’ve never seen a court card postcard before, you can logon to postcards gallery websites online like the darlenesoldpostcards.com and check out tons of them there.

Given that they are highly historical, with some of them often being auctioned at a good rate, it is always an amazing sight/plus experience, when you go through the series of ancient court card postcards, with their messages and names written right across the front page of the card. Check them out, and let us know what you think about them in the comment section below. As usual, I wish you happy surfing.

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards
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What are Art Deco Postcards

Art Deco Postcard

Today, there are a lot of Art Deco postcards such as the Miami, FL | Art Deco District Postcard designed by Anderson Design Group, Milano Milan Italy Vintage Travel Postcard designed by Red Wing Gift Shoppe, Vintage Puerto Rico Travel – Tropical Art Deco Postcard designed by Vintage America, and so on. However, before these beautiful and elegant postcards came into existence, something must have provoked the emergence of this style of postcards. And I’m talking about no other than the Art Deco style of art. So, what’s Art Deco? And how did it originate? What was is used for and how did its postcards come into existence? These and many more we shall be looking at in this article. But first things first, let’s have a brief history of how Art Deco originated.

 

Origin of Art Deco

So where did Art Deco originate from? Art Deco originated in Paris in the 1920s. It is short for art decorative and it’s also a style use on things like postcards and so on. Modern art deco was not labeled as a separate category from modernism until 1966, and though the category never changed until 1966. Art deco had a creative but short-lived moment living mainly through the 1920s 30s and dying out in the 40s. Not only did it influence most American cities but it had a huge impact on fashion art, and also furniture.

 

Characteristics of Art Deco

Art Deco are rectangular blocks, which were often arranged in a geometric fashion, that were often then broken up by curbs ornamental elements. The aim of this was to create a monolithic appearance, but later on, applied decorative motives.

 

Popular Art Deco Designers

Rene Lalique

Rene who lived from 1860 to 1945, was a French glassmaker. Lalique was best known for his creations in glass art in the 1920s, alongside his work in an art deco style.

Joseph Hoffman

Joseph who lived from 1872 in 1937, was an Austrian designer. Hoffman was a designer and an architect of consumer goods. He was a very important precursor of the modern movement and art deco style.

 

William Van Alen

William who lived from 1883 to 1954, was an American architect. William Van Allen was the American architect who was in charge of design in New York City’s Chrysler Building, the biggest Art Deco piece around. William also has a building known as the “Van Allen building” named after him, which is a 21st-century interpretation of the Art Deco style. The Van Allen building was made in 2001 and is the most modern Art Deco building today. The building can be found in Brighton UK.

 

An overview of Art Deco

So what really is Art Deco? Well, it all started way back in 1925, when the International Exhibition of modern decorative and industrial arts, showcased a new design style that breathes excess sophistication and wealth. It was a lavish display of wealth with over-the-top ornamentation, and limitless production means, inspired in part by Aztec and Egyptian art. It was actually a mixture of zigzag modernism, angular and geometric patterns, and symmetries. The more streamlined the shape, the more pleasing it was to the eye. It quickly took over cityscapes theaters, office buildings, government headquarters, industrial complexes, schools and so on. For many years, no one really had a name for it. Spoken about either as “art moderne” or in relation to Art Nouveau Art Deco, it was in the real sense, an art and design movement that escaped denomination.

 

However, it wasn’t till 1968 that the British art critic Bevis Hillier coined the term in architecture. It developed in tandem with new zoning laws that led to the construction of skyscrapers. This gave the world, the most iconic Art Deco buildings of the 20th century such as Shrieve lamb and Harmons Empire State; the building in New York City, William Van Allen’s Chrysler Building in New York City, Holabird and Ruth’s Chicago Board of Trade Building, and Edward Durell Stone and Donald DesKey’s Radio City Music Hall in New York City.

 

It also gave the world some famous artists like French artists Paul: as Jean Carlos’s famous poster aesthetic. The art deco style was applied to all aspects of design furniture, jewelry textiles fashion, and industrial design and architecture. Starting with the Great Depression and moving into World War two, the mood of the country changed. People, as a result, felt that art deco’s flashiness was out of place. Thus, in the 1960s, artists started gravitating back to Art Deco. However, it wasn’t until the 1980s that the Art Deco’s revival really took off.

 

Think about it, people were excited about technology, American optimism was trending, and ostentatious luxury was back in fashion. The famous show Miami Vice featured a newly renovated 1937 Park Central Hotel which was emblematic of the people’s go aesthetic. The 80s version of Art Deco was in full swing for better, for worse.  Today, Art Deco has been showing up in unexpected ways. The best examples of the Art Deco revival are those in which it’s incorporated into an eclectic design scheme. Unlike earlier times, showcasing Art Deco isn’t meant to make a grand statement like it once did. People enjoyed the touch of glam you can achieve with it when mixing and matching. Ultimately, it embodies the mix of leisure sleek shapes and sophistication that are ever-evolving technological era can’t get enough of.

 

So now the question is, will Art Deco and its variations such as the postcards ever go away? One thing’s for sure, history tends to repeat itself, so rather than expecting it to go anytime soon, you should rather get used to it staying around a bit longer. After all, everyone appreciates beautiful art, and Art Deco postcards are one of such arts.

In a nutshell, the best way to appreciate art is to know its roots. And having seen the rich and beautiful historical background Art Decor has; now you understand why people love it so much, and why you can find it virtually anywhere.

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards

 

I couldn’t find a video on Art Deco Postcards – But did find this video on the Art Style of Art Deco

Story of Art Deco
Story of Art Deco
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What are Embossed Postcards

What is a Embossed Postcards

Unlike the other variations of postcards often found in art stores, an embossed postcard is visible everywhere from wedding incantations to greeting cards and so on. So, if you’re wondering what embossing means and how long it’s been in the postcard business, this article is certainly for you.

A Brief Overview of Embossed Postcards (EP)

The truth is, you’ve probably seen an embossing feature on perhaps greeting cards or a friend’s wedding invitation card and you never knew. Actually, postcard embossing has been around since the turn of the 20th century, when people started pasting their own pictures into generic embossed cards, and then send them to friends and loved ones. So what does it mean to emboss a postcard?

What is Embossing?

The process of embossing uses heat and a pair of etched metal dies to raise a design above the surface of a sheet of paper. The bas relief (or male) die pushes the picture up, while the mold-shaped (or female) die presses on the paper from above. And what often comes out as a result of this, is an elevated, embossed picture on one side, and an indented, or let’s say, the debossed picture on the other.

Why Emboss a Postcard?

Actually, embossing gives postcards an attractive tactile and visual dimensional effect. Other than that, it can be used for letters, logos, graphics, borders or other design elements. Basically, anything that you would want to stand out, embossing can help you achieve that.

Examples of Embossed Postcards (EP)

Because they have an elevated pattern that’s visible from both front and back, EP creates some special design considerations.

Choose a cardstock and a picture that is well-suited to embossing – and to each other. Certain card stocks produce better embossing than others, so consult with your printing company before carrying out any embossing effect. Also, the same is true of pictures. A picture with a lot of fine details may not be a good candidate for embossing. That’s why the type of stock you use will affect how the embossing looks. Thus, card stocks that are more soft and thick will produce greater detail in the embossing, while others will create a deeper picture. Embossing is more visible on paper stocks with lower brightness.

Rules of Embossing a Postcard

There are some rules you would have to obey if you want to have a well-embossed postcard for your event. And basically there are two golden rules which include;

Never plan any embossing in the areas where the address and postage will be

This is because the goal of postcards is so that the addresses can be easily read. And, if you emboss the area where the address is often located, people won’t be able to read the address and your aim will be defeated.

Avoid printed text in the embossed areas

It’s more like the other way round. Since you don’t have to emboss the area where the address text is going to be, do not plan to write anything in an embossed area. It is more like a give to Cesar what belongs to Cesar Thing.

Use the embossed pattern as a design element on both sides. Plus, always remember that embossed text will appear backward on the postcard’s reverse side.

Types of Embossing

Actually there is one major type or branch of embossing and that’s known as the blind embossing approach. When embossing is used alone, it is often known as blind embossing. It can also be paired with ink or colored metal foil (using a combination embossing and foil stamping die) to make the embossed design really “outstanding.”

As an alternative to a raised picture, some design elements might work best as an indented picture, which is known as debossing. In this case, the male and female dies are reversed.

How to Use an Embossed Postcard (EP)

An EP is a great way to attract attention to a product, service or event. When paired with colored inks or foil stamping, embossing opens up a whole range of design possibilities, from understated and traditional, to colorful and edgy. Embossing can help you convey a particular message, promote your brand, and encourage people to act.

Having an Embossed Postcard makes an invitation to be it a sales, seminar or event, feel so special. That is the primary reason why embossed invitations are common for special occasions like weddings and galas. By embossing your postcards, you suggest that your event is special as well. Embossing suggests that something is official, certified or guaranteed. Blind embossing is used for official government seals, and we’ve all heard of a “seal of approval.” That’s why embossing on a postcard often translates to quality and credibility.

Embossing is a good way to enhance upscale products and services. Nevertheless, an EP feels (and is) more expensive than a standard one, and that is why it sends a stronger message about the luxury qualities of a product or service.

 

Embossing gives postcards a texture that stands out. With its raised design, an EP feels different than a plain one. An EP instantly stands out from the rest of the mail, increasing the chances that the recipient will read the card and act on it with utmost delight.

In a nutshell, embossing can turn a postcard from ordinary to exceptional. And given that it can be designed in a wide range of custom stocks, ink colors and foils, embossing your postcard would be an ideal thing to do. Or lets me put it this way. If you want people to honor your invitation to whatever event you’re about hosting, be it a seminar, sales talk, wedding, child reception, whatsoever, embossing such a postcard will help give you that prestigious image that will be capable of attracting not only the receivers of your postcard but also people who happen to come across it perhaps from a friend or family member. Think of embossing as a magic wand to getting the turn out of your dream. Try this out and let us know what you think about your embossed postcard.

Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Type of PostcardAverage $$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million Postcards
3 - D Postcards$ 9.00$185 / .502988Postcards
Applique Postcards$14.00$ 29 / 2.73212Postcards
Art Deco Postcards$ 25.00$ 117 / 14.956,972Postcards
Art Nouveau Postcards$ 45.00$ 199 / 14.955,754Postcards
Artist Signed Postcards$ 85$ 622 / 50.0066,038Postcards
Bas Relief Postcards$ 9$ 45 / .99318Postcards
Big Letter Postcards$ 4.00$ 12 / 3.001449Postcards
Composites Postcards$ 3.00$ 17.99 / 1.46219Postcards
Court Cards Postcards$ 3.00$ 79 / 2.001,384Postcards
Divided Back Postcards$ 15.00$ 47 / 7.9514,773Postcards
Django Fontina Postcards000Postcards
Embossed Postcards$ 130.00$ 1600/ *0.0075,239Postcards
Hand Tinted Postcards$ 30$ 371 / 10.484,080Postcards
Hand Painted Postcards$ 18.75$ 750 / 4.581,791Postcards
Hold to Light Postcards$ 29.95$ 1,102.78 / 15.001,337Postcards
Kaleidoscope Postcards$ 33.99$ 59.00 / 1.7533Postcards
Large Letter Postcards$ 13.50$ 102.48 / 8.9917,746Postcards
Maximum Cards Postcards$ 13.77$ 33.88 / 2.00344Postcards
Midget Cards Postcards$ 9.99$ 49.99 / 3.83485Postcards
Novelty Postcards$ 19.99$ 213.48 / 1.334,409Postcards
Oilette Postcards$ 10.00$ 49.95 / 6.993,115Postcards
Postcardese Postcards$ 140.00$ 8,000 / 95.003,946,624Postcards
QSL Cards Postcards$ 7.99$ 51.17 / 6.022,417Postcards
RPPC / Real Photo Postcards49.89$ 2,025 / 4.99282,245Postcards
Topographical Postcards$ 2.99$ 13.50 / 1.27131Postcards
Undivided back Postcards$ 2.19$ 254.01 / .739,077Postcards
Vignette Postcards$ 11.15$ 231.59 / 1.991,261Postcards
Write - away Postcards$ 10.51$ 37.49 / 1.99175Postcards
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Arizona Postcard Locator ( Helpful Illustrated Guide ) W Pricing

Buy Postcard Camelback Mountain Valley of Sun Phoenix Arizona

Historical Origin Of Arizona State 

For a detail explanation, we shall be looking at the various historical periods that proceeded with the origin of today’s Arizona state in the United States of America. Here are some major periods, events to look at:

  • Early Historical Origin
  • Prehistoric Periods
  • Spanish Exploration And Mexico Control
  • Mexican and American War
  • The Split or Arizona Territory
  • The Origin Of Statehood
  • The Great Depression Period
  • The New Deal era 1933
  • World War II
  • After 1945/ After World War II Period
  • What The Arizona State Is Known For

 

Early Historical Origin

There are no so many details when it comes to the early indigenous cultures of Arizona. The history of Arizona cut across Spanish, Mexican, American. This state of Arizona was formerly part of the of Sonora Mexico from the 1822 period. Then the population was not large. They lived in the region as far back as 25, 000 B.C. We have the Hohokam dwellers that constructed an extensive irrigation system. The Hohokam name was originated from the Pima Language which implies Ancient ones. The Casa Grande Ruins are monuments that represent the Hohokam way of life or culture.

 

Prehistoric Periods

Present-Day Arizona is seen as one of the oldest inhabited places in the United States.  In 1848 the United States took control of the Gila River immediately the Mexican War under the terms of the Mexican Cession. In 1912 Arizona achieved statehood. It should be noted that the Arizona historical origin began more than 12, 000 years ago. As stated in the beginning, the early dweller in Arizona was not popular, because they left no written word for historians. Many historians believe that the first dweller in Arizona originated from Asia. This period was seen as the first-century era which was about 5000 years ago.

They were majorly hunters, farmers, and gatherers who deal on maize, squash, and beans. By the period between 1100 and 1300 AD, the Hohokam and Anasazi tribes reached the peak of their civilization, and in 1400 A.D the both stopped existing. Though the disappearance of these dwellers remains unknown but may say the prolonged drought and dried farmland may be responsible. In the 16th century, the Spanish arrived. The native of Arizona are divided into three groups namely:

The Uto-Aztecan, the Athapascan, and the Yuman. many other groups are also here, there came to Arizona from different locations. Like the Paiute from Utah, the Yaqui from Mexico. The Hopi people were known as peace-loving individuals. They have not altered their culture or way of life even living in an isolated area, whereas the Pima and Papago are seen as the direct descendants of Hohokam farmers. Papago implies bean people, who later changed their name to Tohono meaning people of the desert in 1986.

 

Spanish Exploration And Mexico Control

The record has shown that the Europeans began their exploration in 1539. Marcos de Niza, the Franciscan friar was the first European to explore the land of Arizona. He gains access to the area in 1539 with his quest for the Seven Cities of Gold. He was also accompanied by another Gold seeker Francisco Vasquez de Coronado. This settling period was mainly based on missionary reasons. The Spanish exploration focuses on three Gs that is God, Gold, and Glory.  In the year 1775, the Spanish established Fort Tucson, immediately after the Mexican war.

 

Mexican and American War

The garrison commander avoided conflict with Lieutenant Colonel Cooke and the Mormon Battalion withdrawing from the battle. The treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo of 1848 led the secession of northern Arizona to the U.S. This area constitutes 70 percent of modern-day Arizona. No doubt that Arizona was part of northern Mexico in the 1840s. It was underdeveloped, poor, and neglected. The Mexican population around Tucson were few.

During this period, most of the Arizona territory became part of the U.S and the southern region was added by the Gadsden Purchase in 1853. In 1854 the united states gained control of the northern part of the state of Sonora, which is Arizona south of the Gila River.

The Split or Arizona Territory

There was a split in 1863, Arizona separated from the Territory of New Mexico form the Arizona Territory. The area was underdeveloped and remote in nature. The presence of railroads in 1880 simplified the area. Arizona became a state in 1912 but was a majorly rural area with a viable economy. There was exponential growth around the period of 1945 due to retirees who understand the efficacy and the importance of warm weather, and low costs emigration from the northeast.

 

The Origin Of Statehood

In the year 1912, Arizona nearly entered a union to be part of New Mexico in a Republican plan to keep control of the United states senate. This idea was more accepted by individuals around New Mexico but was rejected by the majority of Arizonians. Many provisions like direct elections of senators, reforms, referendum woman suffrage and more but were rejected.

Another constitution was introduced, but there were so many problems. This led to statehood. Congress voted and approve statehood. President Taft signed the statehood bill on February 14th, 1912. Hispanics have a minority power; they were only 53 delegates and he refuses to sign.

The Great Depression Period

This is another major period in the history of Arizona state. The historical origin of Arizona would be incomplete without this period of drought and depression. This period of the great depression as it is called started from 1929 to 1939, that is, 10 good years of depression. No wonder the period is referred to as a great depression period. Government and Individuals placed more emphasis on charity instead of production and creation. Federal money goes into Emergency Federal Relief Committee in 1930. Community-engaged fully in the organization of charity programs. While different agencies promoted help or aid to the unemployed, transients, illegal immigrants, tuberculosis patients and more. The money eventually ran out from 1931 to 1932 and the situation became worst. The revival period came to the New Deal era.

 

The New Deal Era 1933

Here construction programs were very important to rebuild the state, most especially the Hoover Dam formally referred to Boulder Dam. This was constructed by the Federal Bureau of Reclamation around 1931 to 1936. The aim is to operationalize the water use plan set by the Colorado River Compact. This increases the percentage of water availability by 19% to Arizona and 25% to Nevada and the rest to California.

 

World War II

The construction of military bases in Arizona was very important due to the state’s favorable flying weather with clear skies. A great number of unused lands, cheap labor, railroads, low taxes were put in use. Arizona state was an attraction for both the military and private firms who finally settle down in Arizona after the war. Fort Huachuca became the biggest black Army forts. With the population of about 1,300 officers and 24, 000 soldiers to be enlisted.

The 92nd and 93rd Infantry Divisions consist of African-American troops that were trained. During this period, the Mexican-American community was very patriotic and actively support America troops abroad. Material and moral support was given to the young soldiers. Mexican-American men and women organized themselves to assist their servicemen in all ramifications. The huge spending by the government during world war II redefined the economy of the Arizona state, which was based on cattle ranching, tourist attraction, cotton, copper mining and more.

After 1945/ After World War II Period

After the world war II period, the population experienced rapid growth. The number of residents increased by sevenfold within the number of 700,000 to over 5 million. The major increase was attributed to the Phoenix region. Urbanization destroyed the citrus industry since the population has increased, there was a need for housing expansion and developments. The huge amount of growing cotton increased and was less profitable. This led to a decline in Arizona cotton production. But there was a great increase in the manufacturing industry. From 49, 000 in 1960 to 183, 000 by 1985 with a good salary. High tech companies like Hughes Aircraft, Honeywell, Motorola, Goodyear had their offices in Phoenix.

 

What The Arizona State Is Known For

Manufacturing: The Arizona people are known for manufacturing. In fact, this has become a major part of the Arizona industry. Their principal products include but not limited to aeronautical products, electrical, communications and more. This state produces more than half of the country’s copper.

Agriculture: In recent times, the Arizona state is also known for its agricultural impacts on the US economy. They specialize in various agricultural products like cattle, calves, cotton and more.

Warm Weather: Arizona State has remained one of the best weather conditions among the US state today. This is one of the reasons while the construction of military bases in Arizona was introduced. The state is favorable for flying weather with clear skies.

Reputable Political Leaders: Arizona State is known for its reputable leadership. Despite the small nature of the state, they have produced numerous national leaders in both Republican and Democratic parties in the US. Two Republican senators were presidential nominees: Barry Goldwater in 1964 and John McCain in 2008. Also, senator Ernest McFarlan a democrat was the majority leader in the US Senate between 1951 to 1952.there are many more.

Bottom Line

Conclusively, the importance of knowing, learning our historical origin is key to greater development in Arizona state and beyond. The above periods and events are what led to the origin of Arizona state today.

Arizona City Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth

Arizona Cities PostcardsVideos$ Hi - LoNumber of PostcardsEbay Link to Postcards
Over 4 Million
PhoenixVideos$ 207.50 / 2.254,157Phoenix Postcards
TucsonVideos$ 49.99 / 2.002,221Tucson Postcards
MesaVideos$ 29.99 / .901,149Mesa Postcards
ChandlerVideos$ 211.38 / .28617Chandler Postcards
GlendaleVideos$ 59.50 / .9985Glendale Postcards
ScottsdaleVideos$ 50.85 / .11633Scottsdale Postcards
GilbertVideos$ 28.22 / 1.12770Gilbert Postcards
TempeVideos$ 20.00 / .40195Tempe Postcards
PeoriaVideos$ 62.04 / 3.051,982Peoria Postcards
SurpriseVideos$ 195.00 / .25452Surprise Postcards
YumaVideos$ 59.95 / .95787Yuma Postcards
AvondaleVideos$ 45.21 / .0188Avondale Postcards
FlagstaffVideos$ 158.05 / .251,054Flagstaff postcards
GoodyearVideos$ 79.95 / .11465Goodyear Postcards
Arizona Vintage Postcard Value Calculator - How Much is Postcard Worth
Table Shows Type of Postcards, average cost, Hi-lo Cost, and eBay Link to the desired search
It will show you Current Listings
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Dummie’s Guide Timeline of Postcard History

Postcard History Timeline Infographic

A couple of months ago I had some extra postcards that I had collected.  I took them to church and put a sign on them saying  “free if you would like any please help yourself”.  I watched over the next couple of weeks many people very young to the golden in years, were looking thru the pile admiring the pictures of the past.  Looking intently at the pictures than reading carefully through the descriptions on the back.  It just amazed me that there seems to be that enchantment in looking back into the past.

History of Postcards

 

  • PRE-POSTCARD PERIOD: 1848-1870

  • PIONEER PERIOD: 1870-1898

  • PRIVATE MAILING CARD PERIOD: 1898-1901

  • POSTCARD PERIOD: 1901-1907

  • DIVIDED BACK PERIOD: 1907-1915

  • WHITE BORDER PERIOD: 1915-1930

  • LINEN PERIOD: 1930-1945

  • PHOTOCHROM PERIOD: 1945-PRESENT

Postcard History Timeline

These are the general Categories of Postcards you will see as you Pursue your Hobby.  But I wanted to try to look at the history of postcards from a more common sense direction.  I wanted to look at the major events that were taking place during those different periods of time.  To see the important events that many people wanted to capture and record and sen to their families.

 

1775 during the Second Continental Congress, when Benjamin Franklin was appointed the first postmaster general.

 

Once upon a time, mail was delivered by either by foot soldiers or horse-drawn carriages, and the concept of mobilizing and coordinating mail delivery was still in its infancy.

In today’s world of e-mail and overnight express mail service, the idea of a letter taking two weeks to travel from New York to Philadelphia seems almost comical. However, in the mid-1700s, a letter might take as long as fourteen days to make the 109-mile trip between the two cities

The Pony Express was a mail service delivering messages, newspapers, and mail using relays of horse-mounted riders that operated from April 3, 1860, to October 1861 between Missouri and California in the United States of America

Ad in the Sacramento Union, March 19, 1860

“Men Wanted”
The undersigned wishes to hire ten or a dozen men, familiar with the management of horses, as hostlers, or riders on the Overland Express Route via Salt Lake City. Wages $50 per month and found.

More than 1,800 miles in 10 days! From St. Joseph, Missouri, to Sacramento, California the Pony Express could deliver a letter faster than ever before.
In operation for only 18 months between April 1860 and October 1861, the Pony Express nevertheless has become synonymous with the Old West.

  • PRE-POSTCARD PERIOD: 1848-1870

 

1840 – First Postage Stamp, Under a number of reforms proposed by Sir Rowland Hill including a standard price for sending a letter (prior to this, it was the person who received the letter who paid how much was due depending on weight and distance traveled). In 1840, the first stamp is issued which featured a black and white portrait of Queen Victoria costing one penny (more often referred to as the “Penny Black”).

1841 – Wagon Trains Start The Journey To California, Covered Wagon Trains took immigrants on a journey from Missouri River towns to what is now the state of California. The trip was about 2,000 miles and each night the Covered Wagon Train would form a circle for shelter from wind and extreme weather, they would put all the animals in the center to prevent them from running away or being stolen by Native Americans.

1843-The Oregon Trail, The first ‘wagon train’ was the wave of migration that started in 1843 and had followed John Bidwell’s 1841 train, and Elijah White’s 1842 expedition to Oregon. The 1843 wagon train was comprised of about nine hundred people. Bidwell’s immigrants had been split on going to California and Oregon. The definition of this as the first wagon train is made by its number of participants. The earlier ones had only been small expeditionary groups.

1844 –  Morse’s first electronic telegram, Samuel Morse had created an electromagnetic telegraph in 1836 and he had written the code that was to be transferred on it. Morse Code used dots, dashes and spaces to represent the letters of the alphabet. The U.S. government had requested a line be built between Baltimore and Washington, and it sent the first message on May 24th, 1844. The code also represents numbers.

1845 – Florida Becomes The 27th state of the United States of America, On March 3, 1845, Florida became the 27th state of the United States of America. At that time Florida was best known for it’s cotton plantations because the climate suited the crop well.

1845 – Texas Becomes The 28th state of the United States of America, Texas, after gaining independence from Mexico in 1836, became the largest state in the contiguous United States in 1845.

1846 – 1848 U.S. – Mexican War 1846 to 1848, After Texas became a US state the year before, the United States and Mexico go to war over the disputed area. American forces invade and conquer New Mexico, California and parts of Northern Mexico. Another American army captured Mexico City, forcing Mexico to agree to the sale of its Northern territories to the U.S for $15 million.

1855 – Smithsonian Smithsonian Institution, is established as an educational and research institute it is administered and funded by the government of the United States and by funds from its endowment. The Smithsonian Institute was funded by the British scientist James Smithson, who had never visited the United States himself, as an “Establishment for the increase & diffusion of Knowledge among men.” The work on the Smithsonian Institution Building on the National Mall started in 1846 and was completed in 1855.

1847 – first Mormon  settlers arrive in salt lake city

1848 – calif gold rushThe California Gold Rush starts, It was James Marshall that found the first nugget on January 30th, 1848 at Coloma. His find was to draw half a million people to California, and his initial discovery meant that other prospectors were able to uncover beds on the Trinity and Feather rivers. The Gold Rush is said to have taken place between 1848 and 1855.

1860 – Abraham Lincoln is Nominated President, Lincoln’s election for President was followed by South Carolina’s succession from the Union. Its senators had resigned from Congress and several of the Southern states were looking to leaving it as well. With Lincoln not inaugurated there was little he could do, and it was only a matter of time before the Confederate States united.

1861 – The Beginning of the Civil War, The Confederate States of America was formed by South Carolina, Mississippi, Georgia, Louisiana, Alabama, Florida, and Texas, and joined by Virginia, Tennessee, Arkansas, and North Carolina, and it was the Confederacy’s attack on Fort Sumter (on April 12th) that starts the Civil War. The Kansas Free-Staters had prevailed, and Kansas had joined the Union on January 9th. The C.S.S’s capital was in Montgomery, Alabama before being replaced by Richmond, Virginia. Its flag was the Stars and Bars. South Carolina had ceded from the Union on December 20th, 1860. A skeptic of how well the northern States would treat freed slaves was George Fitzhugh, who had negated the North’s ability to treat the slaves well ‘because the master allows the slave to retain a larger share of the results of his own labor than do the employers of free labor

1860 – pony express -The Pony Express, The ‘Pony Express’ mail service used horseback riders in 157 Pony Express relay stations across the prairies, plains, deserts, and mountains of the Western United States to deliver messages between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts in about ten days. After only 1 year, in March 1861 after suffering large losses and not gaining the mail contract The Pony Express Company ceased trading.

1863 – The Battle of Gettysburg, The Battle of Gettysburg was an important battle in the war, with Lee’s invasion of a northern state (from Maryland to Pennsylvania). Some 23,000 Union soldiers and over 20,000 Confederate soldiers were killed by the end of the third day. This was where Lincoln made his Gettysburg Address (on November 19th).

1864 – First Use Of Submarine In Warfare, A Confederate submarine, the Hunley, is the first submarine to torpedo an enemy vessel. It sank three times (which included the death of its inventor, Horace Hunley) before deployment against a Union blockade of Charleston, South Carolina. It sank (with all nine crew) shortly after its attack on the sloop Housatonic.

1865 – The End of the Civil War, The Appomattox campaign of 1865 took place in March to April, and was made up of numerous engagements in Virginia. The number of dead was never particularly high in any particular encounter but resulted in a war of attrition, and the surrounding of the Confederate forces (in which Lee said that it was ‘a mere question of time’ in resolution). Robert E. Lee’s surrender of the Confederate army at Appomattox courthouse to Ulysses S. Grant on April 9th was the end of the war.

Abraham Lincoln Assassinated, It was on April 14th that President Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth while attending the comedy “Our American Cousin” at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C. He died the next day.

1866 – Jesse James, Jesse and his brother Frank James, who were Confederate guerrillas during the Civil War, turn to crime when they create the James-Younger Gang. Their first robbery is the first daylight armed bank robbery in the United States in peacetime of the Clay County Savings Association in the town of Liberty, Missouri, on February 13, 1866.

1869 – Wyoming Gives Women The Vote, Wyoming becomes the first state to enfranchise women and goes on to put the right into its 1889 constitution.

 

  • PIONEER PERIOD: 1870-1898

In researching postcard history the earliest mentions I could find was dated October 4th of 1870 Frances Calvert mentions in his diary today I sent my first postcard to my mother these are capital things they are simple in a very happy invention Frances was a 30-year-old gentleman living in Wales at the time in the United States the first mention of postcard was in 1893 the world’s Columbian exhibition that took place in Chicago that’s where America’s first official picture for picture postcards were sold they were largely distributed out of vending machines at the time Chicago happens to have a rich immigrant population which were very skilled in German printing a year later Britain legalize postcards but they were not very attractive

1871-Great Chicago Fire, The Great Chicago Fire started on Sunday, October 8, and burned for three days before it finally burned itself out Tuesday, October 10, 1871. It killed hundreds and destroyed about 2,000 acres in the central business district, including hotels, department stores, Chicago’s City Hall, the opera house and theaters, churches and printing plants, in other areas thousands of homes were destroyed leaving 90,000 homeless. Supposedly it started by a cow kicking over a lantern in a barn owned by Patrick and Catherine O’Leary, or Daniel “Pegleg” Sullivan, igniting some hay in the barn while trying to steal some milk, or Louis M. Cohn may have started the fire during a craps game.

1872 – Yellowstone National Park, Partly in Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho, the Yellowstone National Park was appointed the United States’ first national park on March 1st, 1872. It covers more than three and a half thousand square miles of plateaus, mountains, and valleys. The park’s fossils, lava flows, volcanic remains, forests and other mountainous features such as its hot springs and geysers (like Old Faithful) have made it a national treasure.

1875 –First Kentucky Derby, On May 17, 1875, in front of an estimated crowd of 10,000 people, a field of 15 three-year-old horses contested the First Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs, Louisville, Kentucky.

1876 – he Little Bighorn/Custer’s Last Stand, The Battle of the Little Bighorn took place a week after General Crook’s retreat from Rosebud Creek, when the Sioux, Cheyenne, Lakota, Arapaho, and others fell on George Custer’s 7th Cavalry on June 25th. The Indians, whose amalgamated tepees could show that there were about two thousand braves, attacked Custer’s squadrons at Little Bighorn. Reno and Benteen’s parts of the 7th suffered heavily but were not wiped out. The Indians fled on the arrival of Terry and Gibbons’ more numerous soldiers, but have retained their name for the Bighorn’s slopes, ” which is ‘the greasy grass’. There is some debate on where exactly the ‘last stand’ took place, with Custer’s body not actually having been found around his men. The greasy grass might have been in Wyoming and not Montana.

First Practical Telephone, Patent 174,465, was issued to Alexander Graham Bell on March 7, 1876, by the U.S. Patent Office. Bell’s patent covered “the method of, and apparatus for, transmitting vocal or other sounds telegraphically

1877-The Phonograph, Thomas Alva Edison announced his invention of the first phonograph, a device for recording and replaying sound, on November 21st, 1877.

1879 –Incandescent Light Bulb, Thomas Alva Edison filed his first patent application for “Improvement In Electric Lights” on October 14, 1878 (U.S. Patent 0,214,636). The first successful test was on October 22, 1879, and lasted 13.5 hours. Historians list 22 inventors of incandescent lamps prior to Thomas Edison but

1881 – Billy the Kid, Billy the Kid, or William Bonney or Henry McCarty, had been captured in December 1880, and was tried for murder in Mesilla, New Mexico in April 1881. He was found guilty and escaped (after killing two deputies) before being shot by Sheriff Garrett (his earlier captor) on July 14th

1885-The Statue of Liberty, The Statue of Liberty was made in France and was proposed by Edouard de Laboulaye, sculpted by Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi and funded by the French people. It was shipped in 1885 to New York and placed onto Liberty Island in New York Harbor. It wasn’t dedicated by Grover Cleveland until on October 28th, 1886.

1889 – The Eiffel Tower, The Eiffel Tower, or the Tour Eiffel, was opened on March 31st, 1889, and was the work of a Gustave Eiffel, who was a bridge engineer. It was made for the centenary of the French Revolution and was chosen instead of over one hundred other plans that were given. Eiffel’s engineering skills would preface later architectural designs. The Tower stands at twice the height of both the St. Peter’s Basilica and the Great Pyramid of Giza. Its metallic construction was completed within months.

1892-Ellis Island Opens, The first Ellis Island Immigration Station was officially opened. That first day, three large ships were waiting to land, and 700 immigrants passed through Ellis Island. In the first year, nearly 450,000 immigrants passed through the Island. The first to be processed was Annie Moore, a 15-year-old girl from Cork, Ireland on January 1st, 1892.

1897-First US Gasoline Powered Car Maker, Charles Duryea, and Frank Duryea were the first Americans to build a successful commercial automobile and the first to incorporate an American business for the expressed purpose of building automobiles for sale to the public.

  • PRIVATE MAILING CARD PERIOD: 1898-1901

1900-Work On New York Subway Begins, Work on the New York subway begins in the first section from City Hall to the Bronx in the year 1900. It was financed by the issue of rapid transit bonds by the City of New York and because no company was willing to take the risk of such a large project. The city decided to build the subways itself by subcontracting with the IRT who ran the elevated railways in the city to equip and operate the subways, sharing the profits with the City and guaranteeing a fixed five-cent fare.

Electric Cars, 25% of all cars that were sold in 1900 were electric cars. It will be interesting to see how many years it takes for 25% of all cars sold to be fully electric or Hybrid.

  • POSTCARD PERIOD: 1901-1907

1901-President William McKinley Shot, William McKinley, the 25th President of the United States is assassinated by Leon Czolgosz when he is shot at point-blank range. He died on September 14th, 1901, eight days after he was shot, from gangrene surrounding his wounds. Vice President Theodore Roosevelt becomes the 26th President of the United States on September 14th, 1901.

Queen Victoria Dies, Queen Victoria dies at the age of eighty-one. She had nine children and left Edward as her heir. Her reign has been used to designate the era and was the longest-serving of any English monarch. She presided over the change of government from monarchy to almost pure democracy. Her Prime Ministers had included Robert Peel, William Gladstone, Benjamin Disraeli, Henry Temple, and John Russell. Queen Victoria passed away in the Osborne House on the Isle of Wight. She had become queen when she was 18 and had ruled for nearly 64 years of her life.

1903-Orville and Wilbur Wright, Orville and Wilbur Wright made the first successful man-powered airplane flight near on December 17th at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The plane weighed 750 pounds and was powered by a 12 horsepower gasoline engine. The craft is referred to as an airship and Orville and Wright were looking for buyers for their machine which was capable of speeds up to 10 mph.

1906-Mount Vesuvius Erupted, Vesuvius erupted on April 4th, 1906, and its southern slope vented to about 1,200 meters. Its lava flow had stopped by the 5th, when a new effusion started on the Casa Fiorenza. This one went up to about 800 meters when a third one had occurred on the shoreline. The volcano’s eruptions had become stronger throughout April 7th and the crater rim cracked and lava flowed. The 8th of April had started a number of explosive ruptures and the cone started to effuse a large amount of fume. The eruptions lasted until April 21

 

 

  • POSTCARD PERIOD: 1901-1907

  • DIVIDED BACK PERIOD: 1907-1915

1908-Ford Model T, Henry Ford’s Ford Motor Company introduces the Ford Model T costing $850.00, this was nearly 1/3 of the price of any other car on the market but still not cheap enough for the masses. Over the next few years, he perfected assembly line production bringing the cost down to $368.00 in 1916 making it much more affordable consequently selling hundreds of thousands of of more cars than any other company.

1909-First Men to Reach The North Pole, Explorers Robert E. Peary and Matthew A. Henson claim to became the first men to reach the North Pole. On April 6, they established “Camp Jesup” allegedly within five miles of the pole. There is a large amount of controversy over this claim for a number of reasons including no independent verification and discrepancies in his journal, and even looking at those Societies who accepted or did not accept his claim makes it difficult to know for certain. The National Geographic Society certified his claim. The Royal Geographical Society of London accepted Claim. The American Geographical Society did not accept his claim. Societies of semi-Arctic Scandinavia did not accept his claim.

1910-Boy Scouts of America, Following a visit to England in 1909 and a meeting with British General Robert Baden-Powell who founded the Scouting movement in England, Chicago publisher W. D. Boyce incorporates the Boy Scouts of America.

1911- First Indianapolis 500, The first-ever running of the Indianapolis 500 is won by Ray Harrounat at an average speed of 74.59 miles an hour

1912-Sinking of the Titanic, The Titanic sets sail on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York. The Titanic had been described as the worlds most luxurious floating hotel which is unsinkable, and was only 5 days out when she hit an iceberg and sank in the Atlantic with the loss of many lives. The Titanic was built in Belfast (between 1909 and 1911) and registered in Liverpool in 1912. Liverpool was the home port, although she never entered it. The White Star Liner left Belfast on April 2nd, 1912 and arrived in Southampton on April 4th. The crew had boarded before dawn on April 10th, and the passengers between 9.30 and 11.30 a.m. She left port at around 2 p.m. and arrived in Queenstown, Ireland before crossing the Atlantic. She struck an iceberg on Sunday, April 14th, and the ship’s distress signal gave her position as Latitude 41º 46′ N and Longitude 50º 14 W.

1914 – The Panama Canal Opens, The Panama Canal which took 34 years to build from 1880 – 1914 (and cost over 27,000 workers their lives) provided a connection for shipping from The Atlantic to The Pacific and opened in 1914.

  • WHITE BORDER PERIOD: 1915-1930

1918-World War I – Allies Sign Armistice Ending War The Allies sign an armistice with Germany on November 11, 1918, putting an end to the fighting of World War I. It was written by the Allied Supreme Commander Marshal Ferdinand Foch and signed inside of a railroad car near Compiégne, France. The terms of the armistice mandated the withdrawal of German forces behind the Rhine, the release of Allied prisoners of war, the future negotiation of reparations, and the continued Allied occupation of the Rhineland, and more. The official end to the war did not come until the next year with the Treaty of Versailles in June of 1919.

1920-

  • With the ending of World War I a housing boom in Britain and the United States leads to an increase in home ownership.

  • The League of Nations is founded but the United States votes against joining.

  • Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is ratified on August 18, giving women the right to vote.

  • The Russian Civil war ends but the country struggles as a famine begins in 1920 and worsens the following year.

  • The Summer Olympics take place in Antwerp, Belgium and they emphasize reconciliation after World War I.

  • The 18th Amendment ( Volstead Act / National Prohibition Act ) goes into force at the beginning of the decade which in turn leads to increased black market alcohol that is sold in speakeasies and run by mobsters who pay off local politicians

  • The Palmer Raids lead to the arrest and deportation of 6,000 foreign aliens suspected radical leftists.

1924-The first Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is held on November 27th, 1924.

1927 – n 1927, Charles Lindbergh flies The Spirit of St. Louis across the Atlantic nonstop and solo, direct from New York City to Paris, as the first solo transatlantic flight.

1928-Alexander Fleming discovers penicillin in 1928 which changed the world of modern medicines by introducing the age of antibiotics.

1929-The Wall Street Crash of 1929 started the period of The Great Depression in the United States

  • LINEN PERIOD: 1930-1945

1931-US suffers worst-ever drought in its history, leading to the Dust Bowl years.

1932-The Great Depression influences economies worldwide. More than 24.5% of the population are unemployed in the United States. Over 20% of the workforce are unemployed in the United Kingdom. Canadian unemployment reached 27%. The German unemployment rate reached nearly 30%.

1933 – Adolf Hitler announces the state-sponsored “People’s Car” – “Volkswagen”

1934-Disney introduces the character of “Donald Duck” in the animated short “The Little Wise Hen

1939 – Germany attacks Poland starting World War II.

1941 – Japan launches a surprise attack on the U.S. base in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, bringing the United States into the War. Italy and Germany also declare war on the United States

1944-President Roosevelt is elected to a fourth term in the United States, becoming the only person to ever do so. His fourth term does not last long however, as he died during the next year in April of 1945.

1945 – The United States drops two atomic bombs on Japan, bringing an end to the Pacific side of the war.

  • PHOTOCHROM PERIOD: 1945-PRESENT

1947-The Polaroid instant camera is demonstrated.

1952-The first hydrogen bomb is successfully detonated by the United States.

1955-The popular children’s television show “The Mickey Mouse Club” premieres. The Disneyland theme park in California also opened during this year..

1958-NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) is created.

1960-Democrat John F. Kennedy wins the U.S. Presidential Election after defeating Republican Richard Nixon. Kennedy became the first president and was the youngest person to have been elected into the highest office at the time.

1963-United States President John F. Kennedy is assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald.

1971-The Walt Disney World Resort is opened in Orlando, Florida.

1980-Ronald Reagan is elected as the President of the United States.

1983-Motorola introduces the first mobile phones to the United States in 1983.

1987-Margaret Thatcher is elected as the British Prime Minister for the third time

 

 

 

 

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Old Australian Postcards ( Helpful Illustrated Guide) W / Pricing

Australia Postcards

 

History Of Australia With More Emphasis On The 1850s Till Date

There is no doubt that a sound knowledge of one’s historical origin is key to everyone. The history of a place gives you a brief idea of what this country has been through, the stages that connect Australia from its past origin to the present. In order words, Australian history tends to connect with the now Australia. In this article, we shall be placing more emphasis on the factors and historical antecedents of Australia between the years 1788 to 1850s date. This is so because these periods cover the early period that transcends to today’s Australian society.

Historical Periods In Australia

Here we focus on two major periods that is:

  • White Invasion Period
  • The Period Of Free Settlers and Convicts

 

The Period Of White Invasion-The Early Arrival Of The First Fleet Of British Ships

Australian history would be incomplete if we tend to isolate the early arrival of the first British ships in the year 1788 at New South Wales, Sydney. This paved way for the establishment of the penal colony, and the scientific exploration of the Australia continent. This later turns to the Australia colonies. European colonialization established a new dominant society in Australian in the area of indigenous Australian’s population. This period can also be referred to as the period of White Invasion or white settlement.

The white settlement period has since shaped the existence of Australian society from where it was to the present-day Australian country. Although it was stated that one of the reasons for the British colonization of Australia was to reduce overpopulation in a British prison and wasn’t based on economic productivity.

The Period Of Free Settlers and Convicts

The first immigrant free settlers were brought on January 16th, 1793 through Bellona transport. Before this time, the immigrant was brought from the British prison system as it was stated earlier. But this set of free settlers came in based on what they can offer to develop Australia. This is not to reduce overpopulation as a site from the beginning, but to add economic value. For instance, Thomas Rose with four children and wife were given 120 acres for farming.

This brings about economic and agricultural productivity to Australian society. Others were also provided free grants on land for two years period, in which a certain number of convicts were allotted to them. The present-day Strathfield and Homebush were the area that was given to the free settlers. Though convicts receive harsh punishment and discipline. There was punishment for any convict who fails to work either by flogging or strict confinement like leg-irons.

In relationship to day’s reality in Australian society, this period conditions today’s economic development. The socio-economic growth and development that is seen today are orchestrated by the free settlers and convicts’ period in Australian historical antecedent.

These periods connote the early stage of Australian creation that led to today’s society. This period has made the country to be seen today as a strong global nation to reckon with. This is so because of the current economic, socio and political structure.

Historical Factors That Are Visible In Present Day Australian Society

Here are some of the visible things that are still evident in Australia society today. This includes both not limited to the following:

  • Immigration
  • Economy Factor
  • Educational Factor
  • Religion Factor

 

Immigration

Immigration has been an important factor in Australia history to date. Immigration is an important factor in both the past and presents Australian society. The national identity is majorly based on immigration. A large number of settlers as made their way to Australia through Clipper, Steamer and presently through the air to seek better fortune and different opportun